Sentence Examples with the word mark

Now the rise of the problems of individual faith is the mark of the age that followed Jeremiah, while the confident assertion of national righteousness under misfortune is a characteristic mark of pious Judaism after Ezra, in the period of the law but not earlier.

Regardless, Clarissa's sugar coated barbs hit their mark all too often.

Emerson's transcendentalism greatly influenced him, and Strauss's Leben Jesu left its mark upon his thought.

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Verses 25, 26 apparently formed the conclusion of a law on clean and unclean animals similar to that of chap. xi., and very probably mark the place where H's regulations on that subject originally stood.

As presented to us, for example, in Plato's surely not altogether hostile caricature in the Euthydemus, they mark the intellectual preparation for, and the moral need for, the advance of the next generation.

Otto was now again chosen German king, and to aid and mark the general reconciliation he was betrothed to the murdered kings daughter Beatrix.

There were catastrophes detrimental to the preservation of older literary records, and vicissitudes which, if they have not left their mark on contemporary history - which is singularly blank - may be traced on the representations of the past.

These belong to a group of four auxiliary particles called te ni wo ha (or we), which serve to mark the cases of nouns, te (or de) being the sign of the instrumental ablative; ni that of the dative; wo that of the objective, and wa that of the nominative.

Back to the Mycenaean age (c. 1400-1100 B.C.) and seem to mark an Aegean colony: 2 but in historic times Citium is the chief centre of Phoenician influence in Cyprus.

In the preface to the appendix containing the local arithmetic he states that, while devoting all his leisure to the invention of these abbreviations of calculation, and to examining by what methods the toil of calculation might be removed, in addition to the logarithms, rabdologia and promptuary, he had hit upon a certain tabular arithmetic, whereby the more troublesome operations of common arithmetic are performed on an abacus or chess-board, and which may be regarded as an amusement A facsimile of this document is given by Mark Napier in his Memoirs of John Napier (1834), p. 248.