What does tuck mean?

tuck meaning in General Dictionary

fit snugly into

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  • make a tuck or several folds in
  • eatables (especially sweets)
  • draw together into folds or puckers
  • a narrow flattened pleat or fold that's stitched in position
  • (sports) a bodily position adopted in some activities (particularly scuba diving or skiing) where the legs are curved while the thighs are drawn close to the chest
  • a straight sword with a narrow knife as well as 2 edges
  • an extended narrow blade a rapier
  • The beat of a drum
  • to-draw around reduce to fold under to push into a narrower compass on tuck the bedclothes into tuck up ones sleeves
  • To contract to attract together
  • A horizontal sewed fold such as is made in a garment to shorten it a plait
  • an extended, narrow blade; a rapier.
  • The beat of a drum.
  • To draw up; to reduce; to fold under; to hit into a narrower compass; since, to tuck the bedclothes in; to tuck up a person's sleeves.
  • to create a tuck or tucks in; since, to tuck a dress.
  • To inclose; to place within; to hit into a detailed location; as, to tuck a young child into a sleep; to tuck a book under your arm, or into a pocket.
  • To complete, as cloth.
  • To contract; to-draw collectively.
  • A horizontal sewed fold, such is manufactured in a garment, to shorten it; a plait.
  • A small net employed for eating fish from a more substantial one; -- called additionally tuck-net.
  • A pull; a lugging.
  • The element of a vessel where the stops associated with bottom planks satisfy in stern.
  • Food; pastry; sweetmeats.

tuck meaning in Etymology Dictionary

late 14c., "to pull or gather up," earlier in the day "to pluck, stretch" (suggested in tucker "one just who finishes garments by extending them on tenters, belated 13c. as a surname), probably from Middle Low German or center Dutch tucken "pull up, draft, tug" (cognate with Old English tucian "mistreat, torment," and linked to Old English togian "to pull," German zucken; see tow (v.)). Feeling of "thrust into a snug place" is first recorded 1580s. Slang definition "to take, swallow, put in your stomach" is taped from 1784. Relevant: Tucked; tucking.

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  • belated 14c., "flattened fold in clothes, pleat," from tuck (v.). As a folded-up diving position, from 1951.

tuck meaning in Fashion Dictionary

a way of manipulating fullness in garments by folding the fabric and stitching a row of sewing parallel into fold. Fullness is released at the conclusion of the sewing. Tucks and pleats are comparable, but tucks tend to be smaller, frequently being just an inch or less wide. Usually numerous tucks are produced in the same area. They generally are considered the exterior of a garment as ornamentation.


tuck meaning in Sports Dictionary

Body position utilized by a diver during a somersault. The diver brings his legs to their chest and holds them in place together with arms. (recreation: scuba diving)


tuck meaning in General Dictionary

(n.) An extended, slim sword; a rapier.

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  • (n.) The beat of a drum.
  • (v. t.) To attract up; to reduce; to fold under; to push into a narrower compass; as, to tuck the bedclothes in; to tuck up a person's sleeves.
  • (v. t.) To make a tuck or tucks in; as, to tuck a dress.
  • (v. t.) To inclose; to put within; to push into a detailed place; because, to tuck a child into a bed; to tuck a novel under an individual's supply, or into a pocket.
  • (v. t.) To complete, as cloth.
  • (v. i.) To contract; to-draw together.
  • (letter.) A horizontal sewed fold, such as for example is manufactured in a garment, to shorten it; a plait.
  • (letter.) A little internet used for taking fish from a bigger one; -- called also tuck-net.
  • (n.) A pull; a lugging.
  • (letter.) The section of a vessel where the finishes for the bottom planks meet beneath the stern.
  • (n.) Food; pastry; sweetmeats.

Sentence Examples with the word tuck

Rhyn made no moves on her, simply rolled to tuck her against his warm body.

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