What does log mean?

log meaning in General Dictionary

To engage in the business of cutting or transporting logs for timber to get out logs

View more

  • To enter in a ships log book as to log the kilometers run
  • A bulky piece of wood which has not been shaped by hewing or sawing
  • A Hebrew way of measuring fluids containing 237 gills
  • cut lumber, such as forests and woodlands
  • enter into a log, as on vessels and airplanes
  • a segment of the trunk of a tree when stripped of limbs
  • the exponent needed to create certain number
  • a written record of communications sent or obtained
  • a written record of occasions on a voyage (of a ship or plane)
  • measuring tool that is comprised of a float that trails from a ship by a knotted line to measure the ship's rate through the liquid
  • A Hebrew way of measuring liquids, containing 2.37 gills.
  • A bulky piece of timber that has perhaps not already been formed by hewing or sawing.
  • An apparatus for measuring the price of a ship's movement through the water.
  • For this reason: The record associated with the rate of ship's speed or of this lady daily development; additionally, the full nautical record of a ship's cruise or voyage; a sign record; a wood book.
  • A record and tabulated statement regarding the work done-by an engine, at the time of a steamship, regarding the coal used, as well as various other items regarding the performance of equipment during a given time.
  • a fat or block near the no-cost end of a hoisting rope to prevent it from being attracted through the sheave.
  • To enter in a ship's log-book; since, to log the miles run.
  • to take part in the business of cutting or moving logs for timber; to leave logs.
  • to go back and forth; to rock.

log meaning in Etymology Dictionary

unshaped large piece of tree, early 14c., of unidentified source. Old Norse had lag "felled tree" (from stem of liggja "to lie"), but on phonological reasons numerous etymologists deny that could be the root of English log. As an alternative, they recommend an independent formation meant to "express the thought of anything massive by a word of appropriate noise." OED compares clog (n.) with its initial Middle English sense "lump of lumber." Vacation cabin (1770) in United states English was a figure of the truthful pioneer because the 1840 presidential campaign of William Henry Harrison. Falling-off a log as a type of anything an easy task to do is from 1839.

View more

  • "to enter into a log-book," 1823, from log (n.2). Indicating "to obtain (a speed) as noted in a log" is recorded by 1883. Associated: Logged; logging.
  • "record of findings, readings, etc.," 1842, sailor's shortening of log-book "daily record of a ship's rate, development, etc." (1670s), from wood (n.1). The guide so named because a wooden float at the conclusion of a line had been cast out to determine a ship's speed. General feeling by 1913.
  • "to fell a tree," 1717; earlier in the day "to strip a tree" (1690s), from log (n.1). Related: Logged; logging.

log - German to English

log


log meaning in General Dictionary

(n.) A Hebrew measure of fluids, containing 2.37 gills.

View more

  • (n.) A bulky bit of wood which has not already been formed by hewing or sawing.
  • (n.) An apparatus for measuring the rate of a ship's motion through the water.
  • (letter.) ergo: The record associated with the price of ship's speed or of the woman day-to-day development; also, the total nautical record of a ship's cruise or voyage; a log record; a log book.
  • (letter.) Accurate documentation and tabulated statement for the work done by an engine, at the time of a steamship, regarding the coal consumed, as well as other things regarding the performance of equipment during certain time.
  • (n.) A weight or block nearby the no-cost end of a hoisting rope to avoid it from becoming attracted through sheave.
  • (v. t.) To enter in a ship's log-book; as, to log the kilometers run.
  • (v. i.) To engage in business of cutting or carrying logs for wood; to leave logs.
  • (v. i.) to go to and fro; to rock.

Sentence Examples with the word log

The most interesting dwellings in this country, as the painter knows, are the most unpretending, humble log huts and cottages of the poor commonly; it is the life of the inhabitants whose shells they are, and not any peculiarity in their surfaces merely, which makes them picturesque; and equally interesting will be the citizen's suburban box, when his life shall be as simple and as agreeable to the imagination, and there is as little straining after effect in the style of his dwelling.

View more Sentence Examples