What does know mean?

know meaning in General Dictionary

To have knowledge to have a clear and certain perception to possess wisdom instruction or information often with of

View more

  • Knee
  • To perceive or apprehend clearly and certainly to understand to have full information of as to know ones duty
  • know the nature or character of
  • have sexual intercourse with
  • manage to distinguish, know as being different
  • perceive as familiar
  • have firsthand understanding of says, situations, thoughts, or feelings
  • have fixed into the head
  • learn how to do or do something
  • be familiar with the reality of something; have a belief or trust in some thing; regard as true beyond any question
  • be acquainted or acquainted with one or an object
  • be aware or alert to a well known fact or a specific little bit of information; have understanding or information regarding
  • accept (some one) become what exactly is advertised or take their energy and authority
  • the very fact to be alert to information this is certainly known to few people
  • Knee.
  • To view or apprehend clearly and undoubtedly; to comprehend; to have complete information of; as, to learn one's duty.
  • To be convinced of truth of; becoming completely ensured of; because, to understand things from information.
  • To be familiar with; is no complete stranger to; to be more or less acquainted anyone, character, etc., of; to possess experience of; as, to learn an author; to understand the rules of an organization.
  • To recognize; to tell apart; to discern the character of; because, understand your face or figure.
  • to own intimate commerce with.
  • having knowledge; to have a definite and certain perception; to possess knowledge, instruction, or information; -- usually with of.
  • to-be guaranteed; to feel confident.

know meaning in Etymology Dictionary

Old English cnawan (class VII strong verb; past tight cneow, past participle cnawen), "to understand, perceive; acknowledge, declare," from Proto-Germanic *knew- (cognates: Old tall German bi-chnaan, ir-chnaan "to know"), from PIE root *gno- "to understand" (cognates: Old Persian xšnasatiy "he shall know;" Old Church Slavonic znati, Russian znat "to know;" Latin gnoscere; Greek *gno-, as with gignoskein; Sanskrit jna- "know"). Once extensive in Germanic, this kind has become retained just in English, in which however it has actually widespread application, covering meanings that require two or more verbs in other languages (eg German wissen, kennen, erkennen as well as in part k

View more

  • "inside information" (as with into the know), 1883; earlier "fact of once you understand" (1590s), from know (v.).

know meaning in General Dictionary

(letter.) Knee.

View more

  • (v. i.) To view or apprehend obviously and certainly; to know; to possess complete information of; because, to know a person's responsibility.
  • (v. i.) To be persuaded associated with the truth of; to be fully assured of; since, to know things from information.
  • (v. i.) to-be acquainted with; to be no stranger to; is pretty much acquainted with the individual, character, etc., of; to possess connection with; as, to know an author; to learn the principles of a business.
  • (v. i.) to acknowledge; to tell apart; to discern the type of; as, understand someone's face or figure.
  • (v. i.) To have sexual business with.
  • (v. i.) to own understanding; to possess a definite and specific perception; to own wisdom, instruction, or information; -- often with of.
  • (v. i.) to-be assured; to feel confident.

Sentence Examples with the word know

You don't know how Kutuzov is pestered since his appointment as Commander in Chief.

View more Sentence Examples