What does innuendo mean?

innuendo meaning in General Dictionary

An oblique hint a remote allusion or reference usually derogatory to a person or thing not named an insinuation

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  • an indirect (and usually harmful) implication
  • An oblique sign; a remote allusion or reference, usually derogatory to someone or thing perhaps not known as; an insinuation.
  • An averment utilized in pleading, to aim the application of matter otherwise unintelligible; an interpretative parenthesis tossed into quoted matter to describe an obscure word or words; -- since, the plaintiff avers the defendant said which he (innuendo the plaintiff) was a thief.

innuendo meaning in Legal Dictionary

n. from Latin innuere, "to nod toward." In law it means "an indirect hint." "Innuendo" is employed in legal actions for defamation (libel or slander), often to exhibit the party suing ended up being the individual about who the nasty statements were made or why the commentary were defamatory. Example: "the former Mayor is a crook," and Joe Alabaster is the only living ex-Mayor, therefore by innuendo Alabaster is the target for the statement; or "Joe Alabaster was paid $100,000 because of the Hot Springs Water Company," with regards to had been known that Hot Springs had been bucking for a contract with the town. The innuendo is that Alabaster took a bribe.


innuendo meaning in Law Dictionary

This Latin word (commonly translated "meaning") was the technical start of that term iu a declaration or indictment for slander or libel when the concept of the alleged libelous words ended up being explained, or perhaps the application regarding the language charged toward plaintiff was pointed out. Hence it gave its name toward entire clause; and also this use is still retained, although an equivalent English word is currently substituted. Thus, it might be charged that the defendant said "he (meaning the said plaintiff) is a perjurer." The term is also used, (though much more seldom,) in other types of pleadings, to present a description of a preceding word, charge, or averment. It is stated to imply no more than the language


innuendo meaning in Etymology Dictionary

1670s, "oblique hint, indiscreet advice," typically a deprecatory one, from Latin innuendo "by meaning, pointing to," virtually "giving a nod to," ablative of gerund of innuere "to imply, symbolize," actually "to nod to," from in- "at" + nuere "to nod" (see numinous). Originally a legal term (1560s) from Medieval Latin, using the sense of "to wit." It frequently launched the derogatory meaning alleged in libel instances, which affected its wider definition. As a verb, from 1706.


innuendo - German to English

innuendo


innuendo meaning in General Dictionary

(n.) An oblique sign; a remote allusion or guide, frequently derogatory to a person or thing perhaps not named; an insinuation.

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  • (letter.) An averment utilized in pleading, to point the effective use of matter usually unintelligible; an interpretative parenthesis tossed into quoted matter to spell out an obscure term or words; -- as, the plaintiff avers that the defendant stated he (innuendo the plaintiff) had been a thief.

Sentence Examples with the word innuendo

Germans are detail-oriented and want to understand every innuendo before coming to an agreement.

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