What does full-blown mean?

full-blown meaning in Etymology Dictionary

of flower flowers, "fully open," 1640s, from complete (adj.) + blown "which has had blossomed," from Old English geblowenne, previous participle of blow (v.2) "to bloom." Figuratively "full, totally developed" from 1650s. Full-blown in addition had been utilized 17c.-18c. in mention of cheeks, sails, bladders, "fully swollen" (by or as though by wind), in this case from blow (v.1), and the figurative sense may additionally be from or impacted by these.


full-blown meaning in General Dictionary

fully ripe; at the height of bloom

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  • having or showing most of the traits necessary for completeness
  • completely expanded, as a blossom; since, a full-bloun flower.
  • totally swollen with wind, as a sail.

full-blown meaning in General Dictionary

(a.) Fully expanded, as a blossom; since, a full-bloun flower.

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  • (a.) totally distended with wind, as a sail.

Sentence Examples with the word full-blown

The best example, however, of a full-blown priestly system with a monastic hierarchy grafted in this way on a religion originally not priestly is found in Tibetan Buddhism (see LAMAisM), and similar causes undoubtedly had their share in the development of sacerdotalism in the Christian Church.

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