What does fantasy mean?

fantasy meaning in General Dictionary

having an elegant for becoming pleased about to always fancy

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  • Fancy imagination specifically a whimsical or fanciful conception a vagary of this imagination whim caprice humor
  • fiction with a large amount of imagination with it
  • have pleasure in dreams
  • something many individuals genuinely believe that is false
  • imagination unrestricted by truth
  • Fancy; imagination; specifically, a whimsical or fanciful conception; a vagary for the imagination; whim; caprice; laughter.
  • Fantastic designs.
  • to own a fancy concerning; is satisfied with; to like; to fancy.

fantasy meaning in Etymology Dictionary

early 14c., "illusory look," from Old French fantaisie, phantasie "vision, imagination" (14c.), from Latin phantasia, from Greek phantasia "power of imagination; appearance, picture, perception," from phantazesthai "picture to yourself," from phantos "visible," from phainesthai "appear," in late Greek "to imagine, have visions," associated with phaos, phos "light," phainein "to exhibit, to carry to light" (see phantasm). Sense of "whimsical thought, illusion" is pre-1400, followed closely by compared to "fantastic imagination," which can be very first attested 1530s. Feeling of "day-dream considering desires" is from 1926. In early use in English also fantasie, phantasy, etc. Whilst the name of a fiction genre, from 1949.


fantasy - German to English

fantasy


fantasy meaning in General Dictionary

(letter.) Fancy; imagination; specially, a whimsical or fanciful conception; a vagary of the imagination; whim; caprice; humor.

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  • (letter.) Fantastic designs.
  • (v. t.) Having a fancy concerning; is pleased with; to like; to fancy.

Sentence Examples with the word fantasy

Now when these poor sun-burnt mariners, bare-footed, and with their trowsers rolled high up on their eely legs, had wearily hauled their fat fish high and dry, promising themselves a good L150 from the precious oil and bone; and in fantasy sipping rare tea with their wives, and good ale with their cronies, upon the strength of their respective shares; up steps a very learned and most Christian and charitable gentleman, with a copy of Blackstone under his arm; and laying it upon the whale's head, he says--Hands off! this fish, my masters, is a Fast-Fish.

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