What does broach mean?

broach meaning in General Dictionary

To spit to pierce much like a spit

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  • A spit
  • bring up a subject for conversation
  • a decorative pin worn by ladies
  • A spit.
  • An awl; a bodkin; additionally, a wooden rod or pin, sharpened at each end, employed by thatchers.
  • an instrument of metallic, generally tapering, and of a polygonal kind, with from four to eight cutting sides, for smoothing or enlarging holes in steel; sometimes made smooth or without edges, as for burnishing pivot holes in watches; a reamer. The broach for weapon drums is usually square and without taper.
  • A straight device with file teeth, made from steel, become pushed through irregular holes in steel that simply cannot be dressed by revolving tools; a drift.
  • A broad chisel for stonecutting.
  • A spire increasing from a tower.
  • A clasp for attaching a garment. See Brooch.
  • A spitlike begin, regarding mind of a stag.
  • The stick from where candle wicks are suspended for dipping.
  • The pin in a lock which goes into the barrel associated with the key.
  • To spit; to pierce as with a spit.
  • To tap; to pierce, as a cask, being draw the liquor. For this reason: To let down; to drop, as blood.
  • to start the very first time, as stores.
  • to produce public; to utter; to write very first; to place forth; to present as a subject of discussion.
  • resulting in to begin or use.
  • To shape about, as a block of rock, by chiseling with a coarse device.
  • To expand or outfit (a hole), through the use of a broach.

broach meaning in Etymology Dictionary

"pointed tool," c.1300, from Old French broche (12c.) "spit for roasting, awl, point end, top," from Vulgar Latin *brocca "pointed device," noun utilization of fem. of Latin adjective broccus "projecting, pointed" (used specially of teeth), perhaps of Gaulish beginning (compare Gaelic brog "awl").

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  • "pierce," very early 14c., through the same origin as broach (letter.). Meaning "begin to speak about" is 1570s, a figurative usage with recommendations of "broaching" a cask or of spurring into activity (compare Old French brochier, 12c., "to spur," in addition "to enter sexually"). Related: Broached broaching.

broach meaning in General Dictionary

(letter.) A spit.

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  • (letter.) An awl; a bodkin; in addition, a wooden pole or pin, sharpened at each and every end, employed by thatchers.
  • (n.) An instrument of metallic, generally tapering, as well as a polygonal type, with from four to eight cutting edges, for smoothing or enlarging holes in steel; sometimes made smooth or without edges, in terms of burnishing pivot holes in watches; a reamer. The broach for firearm drums is commonly square and without taper.
  • (letter.) A straight tool with file teeth, manufactured from steel, becoming pushed through unusual holes in steel that simply cannot be clothed by revolving tools; a drift.
  • (n.) A diverse chisel for stonecutting.
  • (n.) A spire increasing from a tower.
  • (n.) A spitlike begin, regarding mind of a new stag.
  • (n.) The stick from where candle wicks are suspended for dipping.
  • (n.) The pin in a lock which comes into the barrel of the secret.
  • (letter.) To spit; to pierce much like a spit.
  • (letter.) To touch; to pierce, as a cask, so that you can draw the liquor. Ergo: to allow on; to lose, as bloodstream.
  • (n.) To open up the very first time, as shops.
  • (n.) In order to make general public; to total; to write first; to place forth; to present as a subject of discussion.
  • (letter.) Resulting in to begin or use.
  • (letter.) To contour approximately, as a block of rock, by chiseling with a coarse device.
  • (n.) To expand or dress (a hole), making use of a broach.

Sentence Examples with the word broach

Tonight he divided his attention between the knife and her face - no doubt waiting for her to broach the subject.

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