What does bolt mean?

bolt meaning in General Dictionary

A sieve esp a lengthy good sieve utilized in milling for bolting flour and meal a bolter

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  • in how of a bolt all of a sudden straight unbendingly
  • a rapid springtime or start a sudden springtime aside once the horse made a bolt
  • to begin forth like a bolt or arrow to spring abruptly in the future or go unexpectedly to dart on bolt out of the room
  • To shoot to discharge or drive forth
  • A shaft or missile meant to be shot from a crossbow or catapult esp a quick stout blunt-headed arrow a quarrel an arrow or what resembles an arrow a dart
  • directly
  • in a rigid way
  • try to escape; frequently includes taking something or somebody along
  • secure or lock with a bolt
  • move or jump all of a sudden
  • leave abruptly so when if in a hurry
  • swallow hastily
  • prepare or roll into bolts
  • eat hastily without proper chewing
  • a discharge of lightning associated with thunder
  • a sliding club in a breech-loading firearm that ejects an empty cartridge and replaces it and closes the breech
  • a roll of fabric or wallpaper of a definite length
  • a screw that screws into a nut to form a fastener
  • the section of a lock that's engaged or withdrawn with a key
  • a-sudden abandonment (as from a political party)
  • the work of moving with great haste
  • A shaft or missile intended to be shot from a crossbow or catapult, esp. a brief, stout, blunt-headed arrow; a quarrel; an arrow, or that which resembles an arrow; a dart.
  • Lightning; a thunderbolt.
  • A strong pin, of iron or any other product, regularly fasten or hold anything in position, often having a mind at one end and screw thread cut upon another end.
  • A sliding catch, or fastening, for a door or gate; the percentage of a lock which is shot or withdrawn by the action of the key.
  • An iron to fasten the legs of a prisoner; a shackle; a fetter.
  • a concise package or roll of cloth, as of canvas or silk, usually containing about forty yards.
  • a lot of money, by oziers.
  • To take; to discharge or drive forth.
  • To utter precipitately; to blurt or throw out.
  • To swallow without chewing; because, to bolt food.
  • To won't help, as a nomination produced by a celebration to which one has actually belonged or by a caucus for which you have taken part.
  • resulting in to begin or spring forth; to dislodge, as conies, rabbits, etc.
  • To fasten or secure with, or just like, a bolt or bolts, as a home, a timber, fetters; to shackle; to restrain.
  • To start forth like a bolt or arrow; to spring abruptly; in the future or go out of the blue; to dart; as, to bolt from the area.
  • To strike or fall out of the blue like a bolt.
  • To spring out of the blue aside, or out of the regular road; as, the horse bolted.
  • To will not support a nomination produced by a celebration or a caucus with what type has been connected; to-break from a celebration.
  • in how of a bolt; suddenly; directly; unbendingly.
  • A sudden springtime or start; an abrupt spring aside; as, the horse made a bolt.
  • an abrupt trip, as to escape creditors.
  • A refusal to guide a nomination created by the party with which was connected; a breaking far from a person's celebration.
  • To sift or split up the coarser through the finer particles of, as bran from flour, by means of a bolter; to separate, assort, refine, or purify by various other means.
  • To separate, like by sifting or bolting; -- with out.
  • to go over or argue privately, and practice, as situations at legislation.
  • A sieve, esp. a lengthy good sieve found in milling for boltingu000du000a flour and meal; a bolter.

bolt meaning in Law Dictionary

The desertion by more than one individuals from political celebration that he or they belong; the permanent detachment before adjournment of a portion of delegates to a political convention. Rap. & L.


bolt meaning in Etymology Dictionary

Old English bolt "brief, stout arrow with much head;" also "crossbow for throwing bolts," from Proto-Germanic *bultas (cognates: Old Norse bolti, Danish bolt, Dutch bout, German Bolzen), maybe from PIE root *bheld- "to hit, strike" (cognates: Lithuanian beldu "I knock," baldas "pole for striking"). Applied since Middle English to many other short steel rods (especially individuals with knobbed stops). From the notion of an arrow's trip comes the lightning bolt (1530s). A bolt of canvas (c.1400) was so named for its shape. Adverbial expression bolt upright is from belated 14c.

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  • from bolt (n.) with its various senses; from a crossbow arrow's fast trip comes this is "to spring, which will make an instant begin" (very early 13c.). Through the thought of runaway ponies, this stumbled on indicate "to leave abruptly" (early 19c.). Indicating "to gulp down food" is from 1794. This is "to secure in the form of a bolt" is from 1580s. Associated: Bolted; bolting.

bolt meaning in Business Dictionary

Traditional device of finished roll of fabric. In general, one bolt is 91.44 yards or 100 yards lengthy (a bolt of canvas is ... yards or 42 yards long) nevertheless the circumference differs because of the types of material: cotton fiber bolts, for example, are 1.067 meters or 42 inches wide, and wool bolts are 1.524 yards or 60 ins broad.


bolt meaning in General Dictionary

(letter.) A shaft or missile designed to be shot from a crossbow or catapult, esp. a quick, stout, blunt-headed arrow; a quarrel; an arrow, or that which resembles an arrow; a dart.

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  • (n.) Lightning; a thunderbolt.
  • (n.) A stronger pin, of metal or any other product, used to fasten or hold anything set up, usually having a head at one end and screw-thread cut upon another end.
  • (letter.) A sliding catch, or fastening, for a door or gate; the percentage of a lock which can be shot or withdrawn by the activity for the secret.
  • (letter.) An iron to fasten the legs of a prisoner; a shackle; a fetter.
  • (n.) A tight package or roll of fabric, as of canvas or silk, frequently containing about forty yards.
  • (n.) A bundle, since oziers.
  • (v. t.) To capture; to discharge or drive forth.
  • (v. t.) To complete precipitately; to blurt or throw out.
  • (v. t.) To take without chewing; since, to bolt meals.
  • (v. t.) To won't support, as a nomination made by a celebration that you've got belonged or by a caucus in which one has taken component.
  • (v. t.) Resulting in to begin or spring forth; to dislodge, as conies, rabbits, etc.
  • (v. t.) To fasten or secure with, or just like, a bolt or bolts, as a door, a timber, fetters; to shackle; to restrain.
  • (v. i.) to start out forth like a bolt or arrow; to spring abruptly; to come or get all of a sudden; to dart; since, to bolt from the room.
  • (v. i.) To hit or fall unexpectedly like a bolt.
  • (v. i.) To spring all of a sudden aside, or out of the regular course; as, the horse bolted.
  • (v. i.) To won't support a nomination produced by a party or a caucus with what type is linked; to break from an event.
  • (adv.) In the manner of a bolt; suddenly; straight; unbendingly.
  • (v. i.) A sudden spring or start; a sudden springtime apart; as, the horse made a bolt.
  • (v. i.) A-sudden journey, concerning escape lenders.
  • (v. i.) A refusal to support a nomination created by the party with which one happens to be connected; a breaking away from an individual's celebration.
  • (v. t.) To sift or separate the coarser through the finer particles of, as bran from flour, in the form of a bolter; to separate, assort, refine, or purify by other means.
  • (v. t.) To split up, just as if by sifting or bolting; -- without having.
  • (v. t.) To talk about or argue privately, and for rehearse, as situations at legislation.
  • (letter.) A sieve, esp. an extended good sieve utilized in milling for bolting flour and meal; a bolter.

Sentence Examples with the word bolt

She lifted her head to look at him, unable to tell if he meant it as a joke and ready to bolt if not.

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