What does billiards mean?

billiards meaning in General Dictionary

a-game used ivory balls o a cloth covered rectangular table bounded by flexible cushions the gamer seeks to impel their basketball along with his cue so that it shall either attack carom upon two various other balls or drive another ball into among pouches with that your dining table occasionally is furnished

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  • any one of a number of games played on rectangular cloth-covered dining table (with cushioned edges) where long tapering cue sticks are acclimatized to propel ivory (or structure) balls
  • a-game played with ivory balls o a cloth-covered, rectangular table, bounded by flexible cushions. The gamer seeks to impel their ball with his cue such that it shall often hit (carom upon) two other balls, or drive another ball into the pockets with which the dining table occasionally is furnished.

billiards meaning in Etymology Dictionary

1590s, from French billiard, initially the word the wooden cue stick, a diminutive from Old French bille "stick of lumber," from Medieval Latin billia "tree, trunk," perhaps from Gaulish (compare Irish bile "tree trunk").


billiards meaning in Sports Dictionary

Billiards is played between two people on a particular dining table covered in green thought to really make it smooth. Players use a cue to strike the cue ball over the dining table in a bid going to among three balls positioned on the dining table - the white, spot white and red. A new player can get things by pocketing the balls (hazards), or by hitting both various other balls (cannons). (sport: Billiards)


billiards meaning in General Dictionary

(letter.) A casino game enjoyed ivory balls o a cloth-covered, rectangular table, bounded by elastic cushions. The ball player seeks to impel his ball together with his cue so that it shall either strike (carom upon) two other balls, or drive another baseball into among pouches with that your table often is furnished.


Sentence Examples with the word billiards

All the more remarkable spirits of the time, like prophets in Israel, denounced a tyranny which put Chamillart at the head of the finances because he played billiards well, and Villeroy in command of the armies although he was utterly untrustworthy; which sent the patriot Vauban into disgrace, banished from the court Catinat, the Pre Ia Pense, exiled to Cambrai the too clear sighted Fnelon, and suspected Racine of Jansenism and La Fontaine of independence.

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