What does band mean?

band meaning in General Dictionary

imp of Bind

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  • To bind or link with a band
  • To confederate for a few typical purpose to unite to conspire collectively
  • To bandy to-drive away
  • A fillet strap or any slim ligament with which anything is encircled or fastened or wherein many things tend to be tied bound collectively or confined a fetter
  • bind or connect together, much like a band
  • connect a ring toward base of, being determine
  • several artists playing popular music for dancing
  • an unofficial relationship of people or teams
  • instrumentalists excluding string players
  • a range of frequencies between two limitations
  • a cord-like structure connecting two larger components of an anatomical construction
  • a stripe or stripes of contrasting color
  • a driving gear in machinery
  • jewelry consisting of a circlet of precious metal (usually set with jewels) worn regarding finger
  • a thin level strip or cycle of versatile product that goes around or higher another thing, typically to keep it collectively or as a decoration
  • a restraint placed around one thing to keep it together
  • a strip of material attached to the leg of a bird to spot it (such as researches of bird migration)
  • an adornment composed of a strip of a contrasting color or material
  • a thin level strip of versatile material which worn round the human body or among the limbs (especially to decorate the body)
  • A fillet, band, or any slim ligament with which something is encircled, or fastened, or by which a number of things are tied, bound together, or confined; a fetter.
  • a continuing tablet, stripe, or variety of ornaments, at the time of carved vegetation, of color, or of brickwork, etc.
  • In Gothic architecture, the molding, or collection of moldings, which encircles the pillars and small shafts.
  • whatever serves as the means of union or link between persons; a tie.
  • A linen collar or ruff worn inside sixteenth and 17th centuries.
  • Two strips of linen hanging through the neck right in front as part of a clerical, legal, or scholastic dress.
  • A narrow strip of cloth or any other product on any article of gown, to bind, improve, decoration, or full it.
  • an organization of individuals united in almost any common design, particularly a human anatomy of armed males.
  • Many musicians which perform collectively upon portable music devices, specially those making a loud noise, as particular wind instruments (trumpets, clarinets, etc.), and drums, or cymbals.
  • A space between increased outlines or ribs, by the fruits of umbelliferous plants.
  • A stripe, streak, or any other mark transverse into the axis of the human body.
  • A belt or strap.
  • a bond
  • Pledge; protection.
  • To bind or tie with a band.
  • To mark with a band.
  • To unite in a troop, organization, or confederacy.
  • To confederate for a few common purpose; to unite; to conspire together.
  • To bandy; to-drive away.
  • imp. of Bind.

band meaning in Law Dictionary

In old Scotch law. A proclamation phoning aside a military force.


band meaning in Etymology Dictionary

"a-flat strip," additionally "a thing that binds," a merger of two terms, in the end through the exact same origin. Inside good sense "that where someone or something like that is bound," it is attested from very early 12c., from Old Norse band "slim strip that ties or constrains," from Proto-Germanic *bindan, from PIE *bendh- "to bind" (cognates: Gothic bandi "whatever binds; Sanskrit bandhah "a tying, bandage," source of bandana; Middle Irish bainna "bracelet;" see fold (v.), bind (v.)). All of the figurative sensory faculties of this term have actually passed away into bond (n.), which initially ended up being a phonetic variant of the band. The meaning "an appartment strip" (late 14c.) is from Old French bande "strip, edge, part," via Old North French bende, from Old High German binda, from Proto-Germanic *bindan (see above). In center English, this is distinguished because of the spelling bande, but because the losing the last -e the text have actually fully combined. Indicating "broad stripe of shade" is from belated 15c.; the electronics sense of "range of frequencies or wavelengths" is from 1922. The Old North French kind was retained in heraldic flex. Band-saw is taped from 1864.

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  • "an organized group," late 15c., from center French bande, which will be traceable towards Proto-Germanic reason behind band (n.1), most likely via a band of cloth used as a mark of identification by several troops or other individuals (compare Gothic bandwa "a sign"). The expansion to "group of artists" is c.1660, originally performers attached with a regiment associated with the army. To beat the band (1897) should make adequate sound to drown it, thus to go beyond every little thing.
  • 1520s, "to bind or fasten;" additionally "to become listed on in an organization," from band (n.1) and (n.2) in various noun sensory faculties, and partially from French bander. This is "to affix an ID musical organization to (a wild pet, etc.)" is attested from 1914. Associated: Banded; banding.

band meaning in Business Dictionary

variety of values within two predetermined restrictions.


band - German to English

band

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  • volume
  • tome
  • musical organization [radio etc.]
  • club
  • bond
  • brace
  • cord
  • bond of matrimony
  • bond of relationship
  • bond of love
  • relationship of love
  • ligament
  • ligature
  • reel
  • ribbon
  • shackle
  • strap
  • tape
  • link
  • sliver
  • hoop [of a barrel]
  • ledge
  • assembly line
  • range [assembly line]
  • production range
  • buckle [conveyor buckle, assembly gear]
  • (conveyor) buckle
  • (magnetized) tape
  • hinge
  • (video) tape
  • ribband [obs.] [ribbon]

band meaning in Chemistry Dictionary

a number of very closely spaced, nearly constant molecular orbitals that are part of the crystal overall.


band meaning in General Dictionary

(v. t.) A fillet, band, or any thin ligament with which something is encircled, or fastened, or where some things are tied up, bound collectively, or restricted; a fetter.

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  • (v. t.) A consistent tablet, stripe, or series of ornaments, since created foliage, of color, or of brickwork, etc.
  • (v. t.) In Gothic structure, the molding, or collection of moldings, which encircles the pillars and little shafts.
  • (v. t.) Whatever functions as the means of union or link between persons; a tie.
  • (v. t.) A linen collar or ruff used in 16th and 17th hundreds of years.
  • (v. t.) Two strips of linen hanging through the throat in-front included in a clerical, legal, or academic gown.
  • (v. t.) A narrow strip of cloth or other product on any article of gown, to bind, improve, ornament, or total it.
  • (v. t.) A business of people united in every typical design, specifically a body of armed men.
  • (v. t.) Numerous artists which perform collectively upon lightweight music instruments, especially those making a loud sound, as particular wind devices (trumpets, clarinets, etc.), and drums, or cymbals.
  • (v. t.) An area between increased lines or ribs, by the fresh fruits of umbelliferous flowers.
  • (v. t.) A stripe, streak, or any other mark transverse toward axis regarding the human anatomy.
  • (v. t.) A belt or band.
  • (v. t.) A bond
  • (v. t.) Pledge; protection.
  • (v. t.) To bind or link with a band.
  • (v. t.) To mark with a band.
  • (v. t.) To unite in a troop, organization, or confederacy.
  • (v. i.) To confederate for some typical purpose; to unite; to conspire together.
  • (v. t.) To bandy; to operate a vehicle away.
  • imp. of Bind.

Sentence Examples with the word band

In violation therefore of international amities, and practically in disobedience of orders, he broke the peace, caused a band of Mexican cavalry mounts to be seized, and prompted some American settlers to occupy Sonoma (14th June 1846).

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