What does Trace mean?

Trace meaning in General Dictionary

discover traces of

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  • to return once more
  • realize or chase relentlessly
  • make your course or travel along a path; vacation or pass more than, around, or along
  • backup by using the lines of this initial design on a transparent sheet put upon it; make a tracing of
  • follow, discover, or ascertain the program of growth of some thing
  • make a mark or outlines on a surface
  • read with trouble
  • a just detectable amount
  • an indicator of some quality
  • an indication that something is current
  • an obvious level (as a footprint) remaining because of the passage through of individual or pet or vehicle
  • a drawing created by superimposing a semitransparent sheet of paper on the initial image and copying about it the outlines of this original image
  • either of two outlines that link a horse's use to a wagon or any other automobile or even a whiffletree
  • One of two straps chains or ropes of a harness expanding from collar or breastplate to a whiffletree mounted on an automobile or thing is drawn a tug
  • a level remaining by anything moving a track a road a training course an impact a vestige while the trace of a carriage or sled the trace of a deer a sinuous trace
  • To mark off to draw or delineate with markings especially to copy as a drawing or engraving following the outlines and marking all of them on a sheet superimposed through which they appear concerning trace a figure or a plan a traced design
  • To walk to go to travel
  • One of two straps, stores, or ropes of a harness, expanding from the collar or breastplate to a whiffletree mounted on a vehicle or thing is attracted; a tug.
  • A mark kept by anything passing; a track; a path; a training course; an impact; a vestige; as, the trace of a carriage or sled; the trace of a deer; a sinuous trace.
  • an extremely tiny quantity of an element or compound in a given substance, specially when therefore small the amount is not quantitatively determined in an evaluation; -- hence, in saying an analysis, frequently contracted to tr.
  • A mark, impression, or noticeable look of any such thing left when the thing it self no more is out there; remains; token; vestige.
  • The intersection of an airplane of projection, or an original airplane, with a coordinate plane.
  • the floor plan of a work or works.
  • To mark out; to attract or delineate with scars; especially, to content, as a design or engraving, through the outlines and marking them on a sheet superimposed, by which they appear; since, to trace your figure or an overview; a traced design.
  • to check out by some mark that's been left by one or thing which includes preceded; to adhere to by footsteps, tracks, or tokens.
  • thus, to check out the trace or an eye on.
  • To copy; to imitate.
  • To walk-over; to feed; to traverse.
  • To go; going; to travel.

Trace meaning in Names Dictionary

Brave.


Trace meaning in Fishing Dictionary

area of the set-up made up of the line and hook connected collectively


Trace meaning in Etymology Dictionary

late 14c., "follow (a course); draw a line, make a plan of something," additionally figurative; "ponder, investigate," from Old French tracier "look for, follow, go after" (12c., contemporary French tracer), from Vulgar Latin *tractiare "delineate, rating, trace" (supply additionally of Spanish trazar "to locate, devise, plan down," Italian tracciare "to follow along with by foot"), a frequentative type from Latin tractus "track, program," virtually "a drawing away," from previous participle stem of trahere "to pull, draw" (see tract (n.1)). Meaning "move along, pass more than" (a path, etc.) is attested from c.1400; compared to "locate, stick to the path of" is early 15c. Indicating "copy a drawing on a transparent sheet set over it" is recorded from 1762. Related: Traced; tracing.

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  • "track made by passing of one or thing," c.1300, from Old French trace "mark, imprint, tracks" (12c.), back-formation from tracier (see trace (v.)). Scientific sense of "indication of small presence in certain chemical ingredient" is from 1827. Traces "vestiges" is from c.1400.
  • "straps or chains wherein an animal brings a vehicle," c.1300, from earlier collective plural trays, from Old French traiz, plural of characteristic "band for harnessing, work of design," from Latin tractus "a drawing, track," from stem of trahere "to pull, draw" (see system (n.1)). Related: Traces.

Trace meaning in Sports Dictionary

defines marking out the overview associated with the figures regarding ice with all the knife regarding the skate. (sport: Figure Skating)


Trace meaning in General Dictionary

(letter.) 1 of 2 straps, stores, or ropes of a harness, extending from collar or breastplate to a whiffletree attached with an automobile or thing to-be attracted; a tug.

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  • (v. t.) A mark left by such a thing driving; a track; a path; a training course; a footprint; a vestige; since, the trace of a carriage or sled; the trace of a deer; a sinuous trace.
  • (v. t.) A rather little number of a feature or compound in a given material, especially when therefore tiny your quantity is certainly not quantitatively determined in an analysis; -- therefore, in saying an analysis, often contracted to tr.
  • (v. t.) A mark, impression, or noticeable look of something kept whenever thing itself not any longer exists; continues to be; token; vestige.
  • (v. t.) The intersection of a plane of projection, or a genuine jet, with a coordinate plane.
  • (v. t.) The bottom plan of a work or works.
  • (v. t.) To mark away; to attract or delineate with scars; especially, to duplicate, as a drawing or engraving, by using the outlines and marking all of them on a sheet superimposed, whereby they appear; since, to trace a figure or an overview; a traced drawing.
  • (v. t.) To follow by some mark that has been kept by one or thing which includes preceded; to follow along with by footsteps, paths, or tokens.
  • (v. t.) ergo, to follow along with the trace or track of.
  • (v. t.) To copy; to copy.
  • (v. t.) To walk over; to feed; to traverse.
  • (v. i.) To walk; to go; traveling.

Sentence Examples with the word Trace

The crowd of varying forms should not prevent us from seeing that we can trace through their confusion the line along which the characteristic traits and institutions of European feudalism, as it actually was, were growing constantly more distinct.

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