What does Blind mean?

Blind meaning in General Dictionary

See Blende

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  • One thing to impede sight or keep completely light a screen a cover esp a hinged display or shutter for a window a blinder for a horse
  • which will make blind to deprive of picture or discernment
  • Destitute of this sense of witnessing either by normal defect or by deprivation without sight
  • struggling to see
  • not considering explanation or proof
  • render incapable of see
  • not able or unwilling to perceive or realize
  • make blind by placing the eyes out
  • make dim in contrast or hide
  • those that have extreme visual impairments, regarded as a bunch
  • anything intended to misrepresent the genuine nature of an activity
  • a hiding location occasionally used by hunters (especially duck hunters)
  • a protective covering that keeps things completely or hinders sight
  • Destitute of this feeling of seeing, either by natural problem or by starvation; without picture.
  • without having the faculty of discernment; destitute of intellectual light; unable or reluctant to comprehend or judge; because, authors are blind to their very own defects.
  • Undiscerning; undiscriminating; inconsiderate.
  • Having such circumstances or problem as a thing would need to a one who is blind; not well-marked or effortlessly discernible; hidden; unseen; hidden; because, a blind course; a blind ditch.
  • Involved; intricate; not quickly used or tracked.
  • Having no openings for light or passageway; because, a blind wall; available just at one end; as, a blind-alley; a blind instinct.
  • Unintelligible, or perhaps not quickly intelligible; since, a blind passage in a novel; illegible; as, blind writing.
  • Abortive; failing continually to produce blossoms or fresh fruit; as, blind buds; blind flowers.
  • to create blind; to deprive of picture or discernment.
  • To deprive partially of eyesight; to create eyesight tough for and painful to; to dazzle.
  • To darken; to confuse into attention or understanding; to conceal; to deceive.
  • To cover with a thin finish of sand and good gravel; as a roadway recently paved, so that the bones between your stones are filled.
  • anything to impede sight or keep on light; a screen; a cover; esp. a hinged screen or shutter for a screen; a blinder for a horse.
  • some thing to mislead a person's eye or perhaps the comprehension, or even conceal some covert deed or design; a subterfuge.
  • A blindage. See Blindage.
  • A halting location.
  • Alt. of Blinde

Blind meaning in Medical Dictionary

1. Not able to see. Without part or every one of the sense of sight.2. In a clinical trial, never to understand the therapy provided or obtained. The participant is certainly not informed whether they come in the experimental or control supply associated with the study. Also known as masked.


Blind meaning in Law Dictionary

person who is deprived of sense or professors of picture. See Pol. Code Cal. 1903,


Blind meaning in Etymology Dictionary

Old English blind "blind," additionally "dark, enveloped in darkness, obscure; unintelligent, lacking mental perception," probably from Proto-Germanic *blinda- "blind" (cognates: Dutch and German blind, Old Norse blindr, Gothic blinds "blind"), possibly, via idea of "which will make cloudy, deceive," from a prolonged Germanic type of the PIE root *bhel- (1) "to shine, flash, burn" (see bleach (v.)). Compare Lithuanian blendzas "blind," blesti "to become dark." The original sense is perhaps not "sightless" but alternatively "confused," which maybe underlies these types of phrases as blind-alley (Chaucer's lanes blynde), which can be avove the age of the sense of "closed at one end" (1610s). The twilight, or in other words the time amongst the time whenever you can no further see to see together with lighting of this candle lights, is commonly known as blindman's getaway. [Grose, 1796] In reference to doing anything without witnessing it initially, by 1840. Of aviators flying without devices or without clear observance, from 1919. Related: Blinded; blinding. Blindman's bluff is from 1580s.

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  • "deprive of sight," early 13c., from Old English blendan "to blind, deprive of picture; deceive," from Proto-Germanic *blandjan (see blind (adj.)); kind affected in center English by the adjective. Relevant: Blinded; blinding.
  • "a blind person; blind individuals collectively," late Old Engish, from blind (adj.). Meaning "place of concealment" is from 1640s. Meaning "anything that obstructs picture" is from 1702.

Blind meaning in Sports Dictionary

The marathon training course is driven blind, with every competition becoming given a map and program marker. (recreation: Carriage Driving)


Blind - German to English

blind

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  • thoughtlessly
  • sightless
  • unseeing
  • aesthetically challenged
  • tarnished
  • blindfold [Br.] [coll.] [e.g. strike the bullseye blindfold]
  • purblind [fig.]
  • meaningless [rage, assault etc.]
  • dummy
  • lifeless
  • inoperative
  • unquestioningly
  • clouded [mirror etc.]
  • unthinking
  • invisible [seam etc.]
  • walled up [door, window]
  • false
  • blank
  • sheer [chance etc.]
  • at random

Blind meaning in General Dictionary

(a.) Destitute regarding the feeling of seeing, often by normal defect or by deprivation; without picture.

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  • (a.) Without having the professors of discernment; destitute of intellectual light; not able or unwilling to comprehend or judge; since, writers tend to be blind for their very own defects.
  • (a.) Undiscerning; undiscriminating; inconsiderate.
  • (a.) Having such a situation or condition as anything would need to a person who is blind; maybe not well-marked or effortlessly discernible; concealed; unseen; hidden; since, a blind path; a blind ditch.
  • (a.) Involved; complex; perhaps not quickly used or tracked.
  • (a.) Having no openings for light or passageway; since, a blind wall surface; open just at one end; as, a blind alley; a blind instinct.
  • (a.) Unintelligible, or perhaps not easily intelligible; since, a blind passageway in a book; illegible; as, blind writing.
  • (a.) Abortive; failing woefully to produce flowers or fruit; since, blind buds; blind flowers.
  • (v. t.) In order to make blind; to deprive of picture or discernment.
  • (v. t.) To deprive partially of sight; which will make vision difficult for and painful to; to dazzle.
  • (v. t.) To darken; to confuse on eye or understanding; to conceal; to deceive.
  • (v. t.) To cover with a thin finish of sand and fine gravel; as a road recently paved, in order that the joints between your stones are filled.
  • (letter.) some thing to impede picture or hold aside light; a screen; a cover; esp. a hinged display or shutter for a window; a blinder for a horse.
  • (letter.) anything to mislead the attention or even the comprehension, or to conceal some covert deed or design; a subterfuge.
  • (n.) A halting place.
  • (letter.) Alt. of Blinde

Sentence Examples with the word Blind

They will come to my tea and buy light,--the beautiful light of knowledge and love for many little ones who are blind and friendless.

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