What does Beat mean?

Beat meaning in General Dictionary

One that beats or surpasses another or other individuals since the beat of him

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  • To hit continuously to cause repeated blows to knock vigorously or loudly
  • a swing a blow
  • Weary tired fatigued exhausted
  • To hit repeatedly to lay duplicated blows upon on overcome people breast to beat metal to be able to profile it to beat grain to force-out the seeds to beat eggs and sugar to beat a drum
  • extremely tired
  • avoid having to pay
  • be superior
  • make a sound like a clock or a timer
  • make a rhythmic noise
  • glare or attack with great intensity
  • move with a thrashing motion
  • move with a flapping movement
  • sail with much tacking or with difficulty
  • indicate by beating, much like the hands or drumsticks
  • move rhythmically
  • move with or as if with a regular alternating movement
  • make by beating or trampling
  • create a rhythm by striking repeatedly
  • form by beating
  • stir vigorously
  • strike (an integral part of an individual's very own human anatomy) over and over repeatedly, such as great feeling or in accompaniment to songs
  • hit (water or bushes) over and over to rouse animals for shopping
  • struck continuously
  • give a beating to; susceptible to a beating, either as a punishment or as an act of violence
  • be a mystery or bewildering to
  • come out better in a competition, competition, or conflict
  • beat through cleverness and wit
  • degrade entirely
  • just one pulsation of an oscillation produced by including two waves of various frequencies; has actually a frequency add up to the essential difference between the two oscillations
  • a member of beat generation; a nonconformist in dress and behavior
  • a consistent path for a sentry or policeman
  • the rhythmic contraction and growth of this arteries with each beat of the heart
  • the sound of stroke or blow
  • the fundamental rhythmic unit in some songs
  • (prosody) the accent in a metrical base of verse
  • a swing or blow
  • a regular price of repetition
  • the work of beating to windward; sailing as near as possible into course from where the wind is blowing
  • of overcome
  • To hit repeatedly; to put repeated blows upon; as, to beat one's breast; to beat metal in order to contour it; to conquer grain, in purchase to make out of the seeds; to conquer eggs and sugar; to beat a drum.
  • To penalize by hits; to thrash.
  • To scour or range over in searching, accompanied with the noise made by striking shrubs, etc., for the purpose of rousing game.
  • To dash against, or strike, as with liquid or wind.
  • To tread, as a path.
  • to conquer in a battle, contest, strife, competition, game, etc.; to vanquish or conquer; to surpass.
  • To cheat; to chouse; to swindle; to defraud; -- usually with away.
  • to work out seriously; to perplex; to difficulty.
  • To give the signal for, by beat of drum; to sound by beat of drum; since, to beat a security, a charge, a parley, an escape; to beat the overall, the reveille, the tattoo. See Alarm, Charge, Parley, etc.
  • To hit over repeatedly; to cause duplicated blows; to hit vigorously or loudly.
  • to go with pulsation or throbbing.
  • To come or act with physical violence; to dash or fall with force; to strike such a thing, since, rainfall, wind, and waves do.
  • to stay agitation or doubt.
  • to help make progress against the wind, by cruising in a zigzag range or traverse.
  • to produce an audio when struck; because, the drums beat.
  • which will make a succession of strokes on a drum; since, the drummers beat to call soldiers with their quarters.
  • To appear with an increase of or less fast alternations of better and less power, in order to create a pulsating effect; -- said of tools, shades, or vibrations, perhaps not perfectly together.
  • A stroke; a blow.
  • A recurring stroke; a-throb; a pulsation; because, a beat associated with theu000du000a heart; the beat associated with pulse.
  • The increase or fall regarding the hand or base, marking the divisions period; a division of this measure so marked. In the rhythm of music the beat could be the product.
  • A transient sophistication note, hit straight away ahead of the one it is intended to ornament.
  • a rapid swelling or reenforcement of a sound, continual at regular periods, and generated by the disturbance of sound waves of somewhat various times of vibrations; used additionally, by analogy, to various other forms of trend movements; the pulsation or pulsating produced by the vibrating collectively of two tones not exactly in unison. See Overcome, v. i., 8.
  • a circular or program that will be frequently reviewed; as, a watchman's beat.
  • someplace of habitual or frequent resort.
  • A cheat or swindler of the most affordable level; -- often emphasized by dead; since, a-dead beat.
  • Weary; tired; fatigued; exhausted.

Beat meaning in Names Dictionary

Diminutive of Beatrice and variant of Beatrix indicating bringer of joy.
Name Origin: Latin
Name Gender: Female


Beat meaning in Etymology Dictionary

Old English beatan "inflict blows on, thrash" (course VII powerful verb; past tense beot, past participle outdone), from Proto-Germanic *bautan (cognates: Old Norse bauta, Old tall German bozan "to beat"), from PIE root *bhau- "to hit" (see batter (v.)). Of heart, c.1200, from notion of it striking resistant to the breast. Indicating "to conquer in a contest" is from 1610s (the origin for the sense of "legally prevent, escape" in beat the costs, etc., attested from c.1920 in underworld slang). Last tight beat is from c.1500, most likely not from Old English but a shortening of center English beted. Dead-beat (originally "tired-out") preserves the old past participle. Meaning "hit address to rouse or drive game" (c.1400) is way to obtain beat across the bush (1570s), the metaphoric feeling of that has shifted from "make initial motions" to "avoid, evade." Command beat it "go away" very first recorded 1906 (though "action of foot upon the bottom" was a feeling of Old English betan). To conquer down "masturbate" is recorded by 1960s. For beat generation see beatnik.

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  • c.1300, "a beating, whipping; the beating of a drum," from beat (v.). As "throb regarding the heart" from 1755. Meaning "regular path travelled by some body" is attested from 1731, additionally "a track created by pets" (1736), from the feeling of the "beat" associated with the legs on a lawn (late Old English), or perhaps that in beat the bushes to flush game (c.1400), or beat the bounds (1560s). Extended to journalism by 1875. Music good sense is through 1842, maybe from the movement associated with the conductor therefore the idea of "beating enough time": It's usual, in beating enough time of some songs, to mark or signalize the commencement each and every measure by a downward movement or beat of hand, or of every various other article which may be used for the point .... ["Godfrey Weber's General musical Teacher," 1842] Early in the day in songs it designed a sort of elegance note: BEAT, in music, a transient grace note, hit straight away prior to the note it is designed to ornament. The beat always lies half an email beneath its major, and may be heard so closely upon it, which they may nearly appear to be hit collectively. ["The British Encyclopedia," London, 1809]
  • "defeated, overcome by work," c.1400, from previous tense of beat (v.). Indicating "tired, exhausted," is through 1905, American English.

Beat meaning in Cooking Dictionary

To mix an assortment of food rapidly using aim of which makes it smooth and including just as much atmosphere as you can.

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  • which will make a mix smooth by exposing environment with a brisk, regular motion that lifts the mixture again and again, or with a rotary motion much like an egg beater or electric mixer.
  • Making a smooth blend by whipping or stirring with a line whisk, spoon, beater or electric mixer.
  • to combine completely with a spoon, whisk or beaters until smooth and well combined.

Beat meaning in Sports Dictionary

To sail to windward on alternative tacks regarding the upwind knee of a race. (sport: Yachting)

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  • A-sharp hit on opponent's blade that either deflects or produces a reaction. (recreation: Fencing)

Beat - German to English

beat


Beat - French to English

blissful


Beat meaning in General Dictionary

(imp.) of Beat

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  • (p. p.) of Beat
  • (v. t.) To strike over repeatedly; to set repeated hits on; since, to beat an individual's breast; to conquer metal to be able to profile it; to conquer grain, so that you can force out the seeds; to beat eggs and sugar; to beat a drum.
  • (v. t.) To punish by hits; to thrash.
  • (v. t.) To scour or range over in searching, accompanied with the noise made by striking bushes, etc., for the purpose of rousing online game.
  • (v. t.) To dash against, or hit, much like water or wind.
  • (v. t.) To tread, as a path.
  • (v. t.) To overcome in a battle, contest, strife, race, game, etc.; to vanquish or conquer; to surpass.
  • (v. t.) To cheat; to chouse; to swindle; to defraud; -- often with out.
  • (v. t.) To exercise seriously; to perplex; to trouble.
  • (v. i.) To hit over repeatedly; to inflict duplicated hits; to hit vigorously or loudly.
  • (v. i.) to maneuver with pulsation or throbbing.
  • (v. i.) ahead or work with physical violence; to dash or fall with power; to hit everything, because, rain, wind, and waves do.
  • (v. i.) to stay in agitation or doubt.
  • (v. i.) to produce development resistant to the wind, by sailing in a zigzag range or traverse.
  • (v. i.) To make a sound when hit; as, the drums beat.
  • (v. i.) which will make a succession of shots on a drum; because, the drummers beat to phone soldiers for their quarters.
  • (v. i.) To seem with increased or less fast alternations of greater much less power, to be able to produce a pulsating effect; -- stated of devices, tones, or oscillations, perhaps not perfectly in unison.
  • (n.) A stroke; a blow.
  • (n.) A recurring swing; a throb; a pulsation; as, a beat of heart; the beat associated with pulse.
  • (letter.) The increase or autumn associated with the hand or base, marking the divisions of time; a division associated with the measure so marked. Within the rhythm of music the beat is the unit.
  • (letter.) A transient sophistication note, hit straight away ahead of the one it's designed to ornament.
  • (v. i.) A round or course which will be usually reviewed; because, a watchman's beat.
  • (v. i.) Someplace of habitual or frequent resort.
  • (v. i.) A cheat or swindler of this least expensive class; -- usually emphasized by lifeless; because, a dead beat.
  • (a.) Weary; exhausted; fatigued; fatigued.

Sentence Examples with the word Beat

The attempt Hood made in January 1782 to save them from capture, with 22 ships to 29, was not successful, but the series of bold movements by which he first turned the French out of their anchorage at the Basse Terre of St Kitts, and then beat off the attacks of the enemy, were the most brilliant things done by any British admiral during the war.

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