What does Bar mean?

Bar meaning in General Dictionary

To fasten with a club as to bar a door or gate

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  • some wood steel or any other material long compared to its breadth or width made use of as a lever as well as some other reasons but especially for a hindrance obstruction or fastening given that taverns of a fence or gate the club of a door
  • expel, just as if by formal decree
  • render improper for passage
  • stop from entering; hold aside
  • secure with, or like with, pubs
  • (meteorology) a unit of pressure add up to a million dynes per square centimeter
  • your body of individuals skilled to train law in a certain jurisdiction
  • a submerged (or partly submerged) ridge in a river or along a shore
  • a narrow tagging of another shade or surface from the history
  • music notation for a repeating design of musical music
  • a block of solid material (such as soap or wax)
  • a portable .30 caliber automatic rifle operated by fuel pressure and given by cartridges from a magazine; used by US troops in World War I as well as in World War II plus in the Korean War
  • a space or institution in which alcohol drinks tend to be offered over a counter
  • a horizontal pole that serves as a support for gymnasts because they perform workouts
  • a heating aspect in an electric powered fire
  • a counter where you can get meals or drink
  • (legislation) a railing that encloses the area of the courtroom where in fact the judges and lawyers sit as well as the situation is attempted
  • an obstruction (usually metal) put at the top of a goal
  • a rigid bit of wood or metal; usually utilized as a fastening or obstruction or gun
  • the act of stopping
  • a bit of lumber, metal, or other material, lengthy compared to its breadth or thickness, used as a lever as well as several other functions, but specifically for a barrier, obstruction, or fastening; since, the taverns of a fence or gate; the bar of a door.
  • An indefinite number of some material, so formed concerning be long equal in porportion to its breadth and depth; since, a club of gold or of lead; a bar of detergent.
  • Everything which obstructs, hinders, or prevents; an obstruction; a barrier.
  • A bank of sand, gravel, or other matter, esp. within mouth of a lake or harbor, obstructing navigation.
  • Any railing that divides a space, or office, or hall of system, being reserve an area for many having unique benefits; because, the club of the House of Commons.
  • The railing that incloses the place which counsel take in courts of justice. Therefore, the expression within club of judge signifies in open court.
  • the area in judge in which prisoners tend to be stationed for arraignment, trial, or phrase.
  • the entire human anatomy of attorneys licensed in a court or region; theu000du000a legal career.
  • a unique plea constituting a sufficient reply to plaintiff's activity.
  • Any tribunal; since, the bar of public-opinion; the bar of God.
  • A barrier or countertop, over which liquors and meals are passed to customers; for this reason, the part of the area behind the counter where liquors available tend to be held.
  • a typical, like a fess but narrower, occupying just one 5th the main area.
  • an easy shaft, or musical organization, or stripe; because, a bar of light; a bar of color.
  • A vertical line over the staff. Pubs separate the staff into spaces which represent steps, and tend to be on their own known as actions.
  • the room amongst the tusks and grinders within the top jaw of a horse, when the bit is placed.
  • The the main crust of a horse's hoof that is bent inwards towards the frog within heel on each part, and stretches to the center of sole.
  • A drilling or tamping rod.
  • A vein or dike crossing a lode.
  • A gatehouse of a castle or strengthened city.
  • A slender strip of lumber which divides and aids the cup of a screen; a sash club.
  • To fasten with a bar; as, to bar a door or gate.
  • To restrict or limit, like by a bar; to impede; to obstruct; to prevent; to prohibit; because, to bar the entrance of evil; distance bars our sexual intercourse; the statute bars my right; the best is barred by-time; a release bars the plaintiff's data recovery; -- often with up.
  • To except; to exclude by exception.
  • To cross with a number of stripes or lines.

Bar meaning in Legal Dictionary

1) n. collectively all attorneys, as "the bar," which comes from the bar or railing which separates the general spectator area of the courtroom from the area reserved for judges, attorneys, parties and court officials. A party to a case or criminal defendant is "before the bar" when he/she is inside the railing. 2) v. to prevent some legal maneuver, as in "barring" a lawsuit due to the running out of the time to file. 3) to prohibit and keep someone from entering a room, building, or real property.


Bar meaning in Names Dictionary

Boar.


Bar meaning in Fishing Dictionary

long ridge in a human body of water

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  • a sharp pointed raised burr cut in the hook simply behind the idea of a hook. To get rid of the bait or a fishing coming of the hook

Bar meaning in Law Dictionary

1. A partition or railing running across a court-room, intended to split the general public through the room occupied by the judges, advice, jury, as well as others stressed within the trial of an underlying cause. In the English process of law it is the partition behind which all outer-bar risters and every member of the public must stand. Lawyers, being officials for the judge, are accepted within it; because are queen’s counsel, barristers with patents of precedence, and serjeants, in virtue of the ranks. Events whom come in person are also placed in the bar on to the floor associated with the court. 2. the word also designates a specific the main court-room; for example, where prisoners remain at their particular test, whence the expression “prisoner within bar.” 3. It more denotes the presence, actual or constructive, of this courtroom. Therefore, an endeavor at club is just one had before the complete judge, distinguished from an endeavor had before just one judge at nisi prius. Therefore the “case at bar” is the situation now prior to the judge and under its consideration ; the outcome becoming attempted or argued. 4. in rehearse of legislative figures, the club could be the outer boundary of your home, and for that reason all people, not-being people, who wish to address the house, or are summoned to it appear during the bar for the purpose. 5. An additional sense, the complete human body of attorneys and counselors, or the members of the appropriate career, collectively, tend to be figuratively called the “bar,” from place which they typically take in judge. These are generally hence distinguished from the “bench,” which term denotes the complete human anatomy of judges. 6. In the law of agreements, “bar” means an Impediment, an obstacle, or preventive buffer. Hence, relationship inside the restricted degrees is a bar to marriage. Within good sense additionally we discuss about it the “bar regarding the statute of limits.” 7. It further means that which defeats, annuls, cuts down, or puts an end to. Thus, a provision “in club of dower” is just one which includes the consequence of defeating or cutting off the dower-rights that your spouse would otherwise come to be entitled to when you look at the specific land. 8. In pleading, it denoted a unique plea, constituting a sufficient response to an action at legislation; so known as because it barred, i. e., avoided, the plaintiff from additional prosecuting it with result, and, if founded by evidence, beaten and ruined the action entirely. Now labeled as an unique “plea in bar.” See PLEA IN BAB.


Bar meaning in Etymology Dictionary

belated 12c., "stake or pole of metal accustomed fasten a door or gate," from Old French barre (12c.) "beam, club, gate, buffer," from Vulgar Latin *barra "bar, barrier," which some suggest is from Gaulish *barros "the bushy end" [Gamillscheg], but OED regards this as "discredited" since it "in no chance matches the good sense." Of detergent, by 1833; of candy, by 1906 (the procedure itself dates on 1840s). Indicating "bank of sand across a harbor or river mouth" is from 1580s, probably so called as it ended up being an obstruction to navigation. Club graph is attested from 1925. Bar rule initially recorded 1963. Behind pubs "in jail" is attested by 1934, U.S.

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  • c.1300, "to fasten (a gate, etc.) with a bar," from bar (n.1); feeling of "to impair, prevent" is recorded by 1570s. Expression bar nothing "without exemption" is taped from 1866.
  • "tavern," 1590s, so called in mention of the the pubs for the barrier or countertop over which beverages or meals had been served to clients (see bar (n.1)).
  • "whole human body of attorneys, the legal profession," 1550s, a sense which derives eventually through the railing that isolated benchers from hallway into the Inns of Court. Students who'd accomplished a certain standing had been "known as" to it to indulge in the important workouts of the house. After c.1600, however, this was popularly believed to suggest the club in a courtroom, that has been the wooden railing marking off the area around the judge's chair, in which prisoners stood for arraignment and where a barrister (q.v.) endured to plead. While the spot where the company of court was done, bar within good sense had become similar to "court" by very early 14c.
  • unit of force, coined 1903 from Greek baros "weight," about barys "heavy" (see grave (adj.)).

Bar meaning in Sports Dictionary

The pole of metal balanced involving the uprights. (sport: Field Events - large Jump)

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  • Formed by the natural activity regarding the tide or existing. It is found across the lips of a river, that makes water levels very shallow at that point. (recreation: Yachting)

Bar meaning in Business Dictionary

1. Metric product of atmospheric pressure add up to 14.50 weight per square inches (lb/in2), 1.02 kilograms per square centimeter (kg/cm2), 29.53 ins of mercury (in Hg), or 0.9869 environment. In manufacturing, the term 'bar gauge' (barG) is used to point the force is read from a pressure gauge (which in fact measures the essential difference between the fluid's force and atmospheric force). 2. Very long, solid-metal kind, typically having a cross section of approximately 100 square centimeters. Steel taverns may be found in two forms: (1) Merchant taverns include rounds, flats, perspectives, squares and stations, and (2) Reinforcing taverns (rebar) are utilized in strengthening cement in big structures. 3. Body of practicing lawyers in a jurisdiction. 4. Totally or partially submerged sand lender along a coast or at the lips of a river which obstructs navigation.


Bar meaning in Symbols Dictionary

A bar is a retail company institution that acts alcoholic products — beer, wine, alcohol, and cocktails — for usage on the premises.


Bar - Spanish to English

treat bar


Bar - German to English

cash-based

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  • cash
  • lacking
  • devoid [of]
  • barren of [talent, hope]
  • bare
  • absolute
  • utter [nonsense etc.]
  • pure
  • sheer
  • bar
  • barroom [Am.]
  • boozer [Br.] [coll.]
  • cafe [Am.]
  • café [Am.]
  • licensed bar
  • atomic sub [Br.]
  • watering hole [fig.]
  • bar
  • bear
  • (European) lake lamprey [Lampetra fluviatilis, syn.: L. opisthodon, Ammocoetes communis, Petromyzon argenteus, P. branchialis, P. fluviatilis, P. macrops]
  • minge [Br.] [vulg.] [a woman's pubic tresses or genitals]
  • beaver [esp. Am.] [vulg.] [pudenda of a lady / pubic locks]

Bar - French to English

club

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  • water bass

Bar meaning in General Dictionary

(n.) Some wood, metal, or other product, long compared to its breadth or depth, made use of as a lever and for many other purposes, but specifically for a hindrance, obstruction, or fastening; because, the bars of a fence or gate; the bar of a door.

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  • (letter.) An indefinite amount of some substance, therefore formed as to be long equal in porportion to its breadth and width; since, a bar of silver or of lead; a bar of soap.
  • (n.) any such thing which obstructs, hinders, or prevents; an obstruction; a barrier.
  • (n.) A bank of sand, gravel, or other matter, esp. in the lips of a river or harbor, obstructing navigation.
  • (n.) Any railing that divides a-room, or workplace, or hallway of assembly, to be able to reserve a place for many having special benefits; as, the bar of your home of Commons.
  • (n.) The railing that incloses the place which counsel entertain in process of law of justice. Therefore, the expression in the bar of the courtroom signifies in available judge.
  • (n.) The place in courtroom where prisoners are stationed for arraignment, test, or phrase.
  • (letter.) The complete body of attorneys accredited in a court or district; the legal career.
  • (letter.) A unique plea constituting an adequate reply to plaintiff's activity.
  • (letter.) Any tribunal; since, the club of public opinion; the club of Jesus.
  • (n.) A barrier or countertop, over which liquors and food are passed away to clients; thus, the part of the room behind the countertop in which liquors available tend to be held.
  • (letter.) An ordinary, like a fess but narrower, occupying just one fifth an element of the area.
  • (n.) An extensive shaft, or band, or stripe; as, a bar of light; a bar of shade.
  • (n.) A vertical range over the staff. Pubs divide the employees into rooms which represent steps, consequently they are themselves known as steps.
  • (n.) The area involving the tusks and grinders when you look at the top jaw of a horse, when the bit is placed.
  • (n.) The area of the crust of a horse's hoof that is bent inwards towards the frog at the heel for each part, and runs into the center associated with the sole.
  • (letter.) A drilling or tamping rod.
  • (n.) A vein or dike crossing a lode.
  • (letter.) A gatehouse of a castle or strengthened city.
  • (n.) A slender strip of wood which divides and aids the cup of a window; a sash bar.
  • (letter.) To fasten with a bar; as, to bar a door or gate.
  • (n.) To restrict or confine, as if by a bar; to impede; to impair; to prevent; to prohibit; since, to bar the entry of evil; distance pubs our sexual intercourse; the statute bars my right; just the right is banned by-time; a release bars the plaintiff's recovery; -- sometimes with up.
  • (letter.) To except; to exclude by exemption.
  • (letter.) To mix with several stripes or outlines.

Sentence Examples with the word Bar

Others were exposed to bar room fights, muggings, schooled in army combat or at least been the recipient of a bloody nose from a third grade bully.

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