What does BALLAST mean?

BALLAST meaning in General Dictionary

To regular as a vessel by placing hefty substances in hold

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  • Any heavy compound as rock iron an such like put in the hold to sink a vessel into the liquid to such a depth regarding avoid capsizing
  • coarse gravel laid to make a bed for roads and railroads
  • make regular with a ballast
  • a feature that will offer security in character and morals; something that steadies your brain or emotions
  • a resistor inserted into a circuit to compensate for modifications (as those due to temperature changes)
  • a power product for starting and controlling fluorescent and discharge lamps
  • any hefty product always support a ship or airship
  • Any hefty material, as rock, metal, etc., put in the hold to sink a vessel within the water to such a level concerning prevent capsizing.
  • Any heavy matter put in the car of a balloon to give it steadiness.
  • Gravel, damaged rock, etc., laid within the sleep of a railroad to really make it fast and solid.
  • The larger solids, as broken stone or gravel, found in making cement.
  • Fig.: whatever gives, or helps preserve, uprightness, steadiness, and protection.
  • To constant, as a vessel, by placing heavy substances in the hold.
  • To complete, as bed of a railroad, with gravel, rock, etc., so as to make it firm and solid.
  • maintain constant; to constant, morally.

BALLAST meaning in Law Dictionary

In marine insurance. There was substantial example between ballast and dunnage. The former can be used for trimming the ship, and taking it right down to a draft of liquid appropriate and safe for cruising. Dunnage is placed beneath the cargo to keep it from becoming wetted by-water getting into the hold, or between the various parcels to help keep all of them from bruising and hurting one another. Great Western Ins. Co. v. Thwing, 13 Wall. 674, 20 L. Ed. 607.


BALLAST meaning in Etymology Dictionary

"heavy material accustomed steady a ship," 1520s, from center English bar "bare" (see bare; in this case "mere") + last "a load, burden," or lent from identical terms in North-Sea Germanic and Scandinavian (compare Old Danish barlast, 14c.). "Mere" because not carried for commercial purposes. Dutch balg-last "ballast," actually "belly-load," is a folk-etymology corruption.


BALLAST meaning in Sports Dictionary

additional weight put into the yacht to improve its security and work as a counterbalance from the ramifications of the wind on sails. (sport: Yachting)


BALLAST - German to English

ballast

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  • dead cargo
  • weight of tradition
  • dummy load
  • luggage [coll.] [fig.]
  • burden

BALLAST - French to English

ballast (container)

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  • ballast
  • trackbed

BALLAST meaning in General Dictionary

(a.) Any hefty material, as stone, iron, etc., placed into the hold to sink a vessel into the liquid to these types of a depth on avoid capsizing.

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  • (a.) Any heavy matter put into the car of a balloon so it can have steadiness.
  • (a.) Gravel, damaged rock, etc., laid when you look at the bed of a railroad to make it firm and solid.
  • (a.) The more expensive solids, as broken rock or gravel, utilized in making cement.
  • (a.) Fig.: That which provides, or helps you to maintain, uprightness, steadiness, and security.
  • (v. t.) To regular, as a vessel, by putting hefty substances when you look at the hold.
  • (v. t.) To fill in, as the bed of a railroad, with gravel, stone, etc., so as to make it fast and solid.
  • (v. t.) Maintain constant; to steady, morally.

Sentence Examples with the word BALLAST

Broad and 9 long, covered with heath, upon which the ballast was laid.

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