What does -ate mean?

-ate meaning in Etymology Dictionary

word-forming element utilized in developing nouns from Latin words ending in -atus, -atum (eg property, primate, senate). Those who found English via Old and center French often arrived with -at, but an -e had been included after c.1400 to point the long vowel. The suffix may also mark adjectives, formed from Latin previous participals in -atus, -ata (eg desolate, reasonable, individual), again, they often had been followed in center English as -at, with an -e appended after c.1400.

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  • verbal suffix for Latin verbs in -are, identical with -ate (1). Old English frequently made verbs from adjectives by adding a verbal ending to your word (including gnornian "be unfortunate, mourn," gnorn "unfortunate, despondent"), but whilst the inflections wore down English words in late Old and early Middle English, truth be told there had become no distinction between the adjective as well as the verb in dried out, vacant, warm, etc. Thus used to the identification of adjectival and spoken forms of a word, the English, when they started initially to increase their Latin-based vocabulary after c.1500, just made verbs from Latin past-participial adjectives without switching their type (such as aggravate, substantiate) also it became the customized that Latin verbs had been anglicized from their particular past participle stems.
  • in biochemistry, word-forming factor always form the names of salts from acids in -ic; from Latin -atus, -atum, suffix found in developing adjectives and thence nouns; identical with -ate (1). The substance formed, as an example, because of the activity of acetic acid (vinegar) on lead was explained within the 18th century as plumbum acetatum, i.e. acetated lead. Acetatum was then taken as a noun definition "the acetated (product)," for example. acetate. [W.E. Flood, "The Origins of Chemical Names," London, 1963]

-ate meaning in General Dictionary

As an ending of participles or participial adjectives it's comparable to -ed; since, situate or situated; animate or animated.

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  • As the ending of a verb, it indicates to create, resulting in, to behave, etc.; as, to propitiate (to produce propitious); to animate (to provide life to).
  • As a noun suffix, it marks the broker; since, curate, delegate. It in addition often marks the office or self-esteem; since, tribunate.
  • In chemistry it's familiar with denote the salts created from those acids whose brands end -ic (excepting binary or halogen acids); because, sulphate from sulphuric acid, nitrate from nitric acid, etc. Furthermore found in the case of particular fundamental salts.

-ate meaning in General Dictionary

As an ending of participles or participial adjectives it really is equivalent to -ed; as, situate or situated; animate or animated.

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  • while the ending of a verb, it indicates to help make, to cause, to act, etc.; since, to propitiate (to make propitious); to animate (to offer life to).
  • As a noun suffix, it marks the agent; because, curate, delegate. Additionally sometimes marks any office or self-esteem; since, tribunate.
  • In chemistry it is regularly denote the salts formed from those acids whose names end -ic (excepting binary or halogen acids); as, sulphate from sulphuric acid, nitrate from nitric acid, etc. Furthermore utilized in the case of certain fundamental salts.