Sentence Examples with the word won

German priests and bishops carried the Christian faith to the Czechs and the Moravians, laboured among the Hungarians and the Poles, and won the wide district between the Elbe and the Oder at once for Christianity and for the German nation.

In 1706 it won the right to appoint its own treasurer to care for money appropriated for extraordinary purposes, and eight years later the governor assented to an act which gave to this officer the custody of practically all public money.

Campbell'S Poetry, In Spite Of A Certain Lack Of Compression, Is Full Of Dramatic Vigour; Roberts Has Put Some Of His Best Work Into Sonnets And Short Lyrics, While Carman Has Been Very Tsuccessful With The Ballad, The Untrammelled Swing And Sweep Of Which He Has Finely Caught; The Simplicity And Severity Of Cameron'S Style Won The Commendation Of Even So Exacting A Critic As Matthew Arnold.

View more

In the Mexican War he won two brevets for gallantry - that of captain for Molino del Rey and that of major for Chapultepec. He served at West Point as instructor and adjutant (1849-1855), and he took part in the Utah expedition.

He discharged his duties with ability and success, and although the boldness with which he denounced the aristocratic rulers of Rome drew down upon him the enmity of powerful Iren, he won the favour and esteem of the pope, who gave him an official position at his court.

However much they might personally disapprove, ' zealous priests could not forbid their parishioners to dance on Sunday, if the practice had won widespread toleration; on the other hand, they could not relax the usual discipline of the church on the strength of a few unguarded opinions of too indulgent casuists.

The next year Crichton was in Venice, and won the friendship of Aldus Manutius by his Latin ode In appulsu ad urbem Venetam de Proprio statu J.

He again won the prize of the Paris Academy in 1766 with an analytical discussion of the movements of Jupiter's satellites (Miscellanea, Turin Acad.

The conquests of the Northumbrian kings in Cumbria were ephemeral; what Oswio won was lost after the death of Ecgfrith.

In 1834 he took a first class in Literae Humaniores; he won the Eldon scholarship and was elected to a fellowship at Magdalen College; and after a year, spent chiefly in private tuition, partly in Lord Winchilsea's house and partly in the university, he removed to London (November 1835) and commenced reading for the bar.