Sentence Examples with the word vibrate

A, Body of male Cicad from c, Section showing muscles which below, showing cover-plates vibrate drum (magnified); of musical organs; d, A drum at rest; b, From above showing drums, e, Thrown into vibration, more natural size; highly magnified.

By similar methods, a circular plate may be made to exhibit nodal lines dividing the surface by diametral lines into four or a greater, but always even, number of sectors, an odd number being incompatible with the general law of stationary waves that the parts of a body adjoining a nodal line on either side must always vibrate oppositely to each other.

It is difficult to describe my emotions when I stood on the point which overhangs the American Falls and felt the air vibrate and the earth tremble.

View more

He growled, a sound that made his chest vibrate against hers in a way not remotely human.

Then the middle point is a loop, and the middle flame is only slightly affected, while the other two, now being at nodes, vibrate strongly.

Let, now, the plate be made in the usual manner to vibrate so as to exhibit two nodal lines coinciding with two rectangular diameters.

An ear of another type is found in the swollen second segment of the feeler in many male gnats and midges, the cuticle between this segment and the third forming an annular drum which is connected with numerous nerveendings, while the fine bristles on the more distal segments vibrate in response to the note produced by the humming of the female.

When the air in the singing tube is singing, it forces the gas in the jet tube to vibrate in the same period and in such phase that at the nozzle the pressure in both tubes shall be the same.

The chief experimental basis for supposing that a train of longitudinal waves with displacement curve of this kind arouses the sensation of a pure tone is that the more nearly a source is made to vibrate with a single simple harmonic motion, and therefore, presumably, the more nearly it sends out such a harmonic train, the more nearly does the note heard approximate to a single pure tone.

It is possible to conceive of any number of notes struck and sustained by the fingers as consisting of so many quasi-vocal parts; but when a series of single sounds is played and each sound continues to vibrate by means of a pedal which prevents the dampers from falling on the strings, then we are conscious that the sounds have been produced as from one part, and that they nevertheless combine to form a chord; and this is as remote from the spirit of polyphonic part-writing as modern English is from classical Greek.