Sentence Examples with the word tragedy

Then these two nations entered upon that long tragedy of the Hundred Years' War, a calamity absolutely immeasurable to both.

At any rate he had, at the end of 1777 and the beginning of 1778, been carefully finishing a new tragedy - Irene - for production in the capital.

Matiya Ban's Meyrimah is considered the best tragedy in the Serbo-Croatian language.

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Before this disaster he had been professor of jurisprudence in Upsala, where his first historical comedy Disa was performed in 1611 and the tragedy of Signill in 1612.

He was attracted towards domestic tragedy by an irresistible desire to sound the depths of abnormal conflicts between passion and circumstances, to romantic comedy by a strong though not widely varied imaginative faculty, and by a delusion that he was possessed of abundant comic humour.

Shelley's tragedy is well known as a magnificent piece of writing, although the author adopts a purely fictitious version of the story.

His tragedy Tommaso Moro had been published in 1833, his most important subsequent publication being the Opere inedite in 1837.

The exuberance of the young poet's genius is also to be seen in the many unfinished fragments of this period; at one time we find him occupied with dramas on Caesar and Mahomet, at another with an epic on Der ewige Jude, and again with a tragedy on Prometheus, of which a magnificent fragment has passed into his works.

Baring Gould, The Tragedy of the Caesars (3rd ed., 1892); H.

Godwin's more important works are - The Inquiry concerning Political Justice, and its Influence on General Virtue and Happiness (1793); Things as they are, or the Adventures of Caleb Williams (1794); The Inquirer, a series of Essays (1797); Memoirs of the Author of the Rights of Woman (1798); St Leon, a Tale of the Sixteenth Century (1799); Antonio, a Tragedy (1800); The Life of Chaucer (1803); Fleetwood, a Novel (1805); Faulkner, a Tragedy (1807); Essay on Sepulchres (1809); Lives of Edward and John Philips, the Nephews of Milton (1815); Mandeville, a Tale of the Times of Cromwell (1817); Of Population, an answer to Malthus (1820); History of the Commonwealth (1824-1828); Cloudesley, a Novel (1830); Thoughts on Man, a series of Essays (1831); Lives of the Necromancers (1834).