Sentence Examples with the word seldom

Unfortunately Egyptologists have rarely a wide knowledge of the myths of the lower races, while anthropologists are seldom or never Egyptologists.

They value children, and seldom practised infanticide, and cannibalism was rare.

In coinage it is one of the commonest units in early times; from Phoenicia, round the coast to Macedonia, it is predominant (17); at a maximum of 230 (Ialysus), it is in Macedonia 224, but seldom exceeds 220 elsewhere, the earliest Lydian of the 7th century being 219, and the general average of coins 218.

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Long, sloping gradually toward their centres, are usually covered with detritus from the neighbouring mountains, and seldom have a distinct drainage outlet.

Hence a complaint that the population is overstated is seldom heard, and hence, also, popular charges of an undercount afford little evidence that the population was really larger than stated by the census.

Usually I enjoy seeing the gentle flakes and they cause me little aggravation with their accumulation as I seldom travel more than a block or two when I secure provisions.

It is also possible to find in them many anticipations of the views of the economists of later times; but such statements were as a rule generated merely by the heat of controversy on some measure or event of practical importance, and when the controversy died down were seldom regarded or incorporated in a scientific system.

The leaves are rather short, curved, and often twisted; the male catkins, in dense cylindrical whorls, fill the air of the forest with their sulphur-like pollen in May or June, and fecundate the purple female flowers, which, at first sessile and erect, then become recurved on a lengthening stalk; the ovate cones, about the length of the leaves, do not reach maturity until the autumn of the following year, and the seeds are seldom scattered until the third spring; the cone-scales terminate in a pyramidal FIG.

They suffered, not only from the regular taxes, which were seldom remitted even after bad seasons, but also from monopolies; and Procopius goes so far as to allege that the emperor made a practice of further recruiting his treasury by confiscating on slight or fictitious pretexts the property of persons who had displeased Theodora or himself.

He was deservedly respected in the House of Commons; seldom has an agitator been so little of a demagogue.