Sentence Examples with the word scourge

This was the period of those devastating raids which made the savage Magyar horsemen the scourge and the terror of Europe.

The various species of rapacious animals are disappearing, together with the colonies of marmots; the insectivores are also becoming scarce in consequence of the destruction of insects; while vermin, such as the suslik, or pouched marmot (Spermophilus), and the destructive insects which are a scourge to agriculture, become a real plague.

A scourge which so seriously menaced the very existence of the silkworm in the world necessarily attracted a great amount of attention.

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Ankylostomiasis is a disease which finds a congenial habitat in the warm damp atmosphere of mines, and has become a veritable scourge in some mining regions.

For about 46 years they were the scourge of the western half of Asia Minor, ravaging the country, as allies of one or other of the warring princes, without any serious check, until Attalus I., king of Pergamum (241-197), inflicted several severe defeats upon them, and about 232 B.C. forced them to settle permanently in the region to which they gave their name.

Napoleon, moreover, he regarded not as the scourge of Europe, but as the defender of civilization against the barbarism of the Slays; and in the famous interview between the two men at Erfurt the poet's admiration was reciprocated by the French conqueror.

The chief scourge is the sirocco, which is experienced in its most characteristic form on the north coast, as an oppressive, parching, hot, dry wind, blowing strongly and steadily from the south, the atmosphere remaining through the whole period of its duration leaden-coloured and hazy in consequence of the presence of immense quantities of reddish dust.

Florus actually dared to scourge and crucify Jews who belonged to the Roman order of knights.

Among the rodents the hamster and the field-mouse are a scourge to agriculture.

The danger from the Iroquois on Lake Ontario had long cut her off from the most direct access to the West, and from the occupation of the Ohio valley leading to the Mississippi, but now free from this savage scourge she could go where she would.