Sentence Examples with the word regarding

An excellent summary regarding the magnetic properties of matter, with many tables and references, has been compiled by du Bois (Report to the Congres Int.

That this is the right way of regarding the subject appears from the events of the first two decades of the 16th century, those years in which the humanistic revival attained its highest point in Italy.

An account of a disputation held between Mani and the bishop Archelaus of Cascar, in Mesopotamia; but they nevertheless contain much that is trustworthy, especially regarding the doctrine of Mani, and they also include Manichaean documents.

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For the Pharisee who accepts the answer of Jesus regarding that fundamental doctrine which ranks the love of one's neighbour as the highest duty after the love of God (Mark xii.

They determined (I) that all correspondence and documents regarding every matter The brought before the government officials should be language conducted in the language in which it was first intro- ordinances duced.

He found it laughable that the living invented so many myths to create a false sense of security regarding the dark predators.

Hence there seem to be good reasons for regarding the likeness in question as due to similarity in habitat and not as mimetic.

In the prolonged discussions regarding the Bill of Indemnity he was instrumental in saving the life of Haselrig, and opposed the clause compelling all officers who had served under Cromwell to refund their salaries, he himself never having had any.

With all its idealism, Greek thought had difficulty in regarding rational necessity as absolute master of the physical world.

Poulton, in an admirable discussion of contemporary views regarding species (presidential address to the Entomological Society of London 1904), has shown that Darwin did not believe in the objective existence of species, not only because he was led to discard the hypothesis of special creation as the explanation of the polymorphism of life, but because in practice as a working systematist he could neither find for himself nor ascertain from other systematists any settled criteria by which a group of specimens could be elevated into a genus, accepted as a species, or regarded as a variety.