Sentence Examples with the word quest

Tasmanian savages were crafty warriors and kangaroo-hunters, and the women climbed the highest trees by notching, in quest of opossums. Shell-fish and crabs were taken, and seals knocked on the head with clubs, but neither fish-hook nor fishing-net was known, and indeed swimming fish were taboo as food.

In order to rid himself of Jason, Pelias sent him to Colchis in quest of the golden fleece, and took advantage of his absence to put to death his father, Aeson, his mother and brother.

THE HOLY GRAIL, the famous talisman of Arthurian romance, the object of quest on the part of the knights of the Round Table.

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It had the effect they desired of convincing the Others he had crushed the gem and was unleashing hell on earth in his quest for revenge for them taking Jessi.

Between the two I'm sure of my triumphant success in completing this stage of my quest to hunt down this distractor in my road of adventure.

New Zealand Tom and Don Miguel, after at various times creating great havoc among the boats of different vessels, were finally gone in quest of, systematically hunted out, chased and killed by valiant whaling captains, who heaved up their anchors with that express object as much in view, as in setting out through the Narragansett Woods, Captain Butler of old had it in his mind to capture that notorious murderous savage Annawon, the headmost warrior of the Indian King Philip.

Where the orchestra shows that Parsifal is becoming half-conscious of his quest while Kundry is beguiling him with memories of his mother, - and also during the two changes of scene to the Hall of the Grail, where the orchestra mingles the agony of Amfortas and the sorrow of the knights with the tolling of the great bells, - the polyphony is almost as dramatic as in Tristan; while the prelude and the Charfreitagszauber are among the clearest examples of the sublime since Beethoven.

The search for gold and the quest for unoccupied pasturage daily diminish the extent of these areas.

Depending mainly for food on the seeds of conifers, the movements of crossbills are irregular beyond those of most birds, and they would seem to rove in any direction and at any season in quest of their staple sustenance.

In consequence of this every summer no fewer than 800,000 emigrate temporarily to Germany in quest of work.