Sentence Examples with the word plymouth

He studied men rather than books; became acquainted with the vices in what was then a pioneer town; and in his Seven Lectures to Young Men (1844) treated these with genuine power of realistic description and with youthful and exuberant rhetoric. Eight years later (1847) he accepted a call to the pastorate of Plymouth Church (Congregational), then newly organized in Brooklyn, New York.

In 1627 Governor William Bradford of Plymouth protested by letter to the Dutch against their occupancy, and this warning from the Pilgrims was repeated at least twice.

When and how the town and the colony of Plymouth became differentiated is not clear.

View more

But the Connecticut authorities in their effort to establish a legal claim to the country and to thwart the efforts of the Hamilton family to assert its claims to the territory between the Connecticut river and Narragansett Bay - claims derived from a grant of the Plymouth Company to James, marquess of Hamilton (1606-1649) in 1635 - elaborated the theory that the Plymouth Company had made a grant to Warwick, and that consequently his quit claim conferred jurisdiction upon the Say and Sele Company; but even in this event, Fenwick had no right to make his sale, for which he never secured confirmation.

In 1661 Plymouth sold its interests, and soon afterward the four purchasers abandoned the post.

Part of Plymouth was established as Plympton in 1707, and part as Kingston in 1726.

The majority of the Brethren out of Plymouth supported Darby, but a minority remained with Newton.

In 1633 Captain William Holmes, of the Plymouth Colony, established near the mouth of the Farmington river a trading post, the first settlement by Englishmen in Connecticut; a more important and a permanent settlement (until 1637 called New Dorchester) was made in 1635 by immigrants from Dorchester, Massachusetts, led by the Rev. John Wareham, Roger Ludlow and others.

It is pleasant to think that there is foundation for the familiar story of Sir Francis Drake playing bowls on Plymouth Hoe as the Armada was beating up Channel, and finishing his game before tackling the Spaniards.

It may be said to begin with the arrival in 1620 of a small company including William Brewster, elder of the refugee church in Leiden, which founded Plymouth in the modern Massachusetts in the winter of that year.