Sentence Examples with the word pierre

Among these were Auguste Francois Chomel (1788-1858), Pierre Charles Alexandre Louis (1787-1872), Jean Cruveilhier (1791-1874) and Gabriel Andral (1797-1876).

So the first task Pierre had to face was one for which he had very little aptitude or inclination--practical business.

Natasha was less animated than she had been the day before; but that day as he looked at her Pierre sometimes felt as if he was vanishing and that neither he nor she existed any longer, that nothing existed but happiness.

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Under the influence of the wine he had drunk, and after the days he had spent alone with his depressing thoughts, Pierre involuntarily enjoyed talking with this cheerful and good-natured man.

Steeling herself, she passed Pierre at her door and knocked on Damian's door.

That a sovereign like St Louis should be able to associate himself officially with the feudalism of his realm to repress abuses of church jurisdiction; that a contemporary of Philip the Fair, the lawyer Pierre Dubois, should dare to suggest the secularization of ecclesiastical property and the conversion of the clergy into a class of functionaries paid out of the royal treasury; and that Philip the Fair, the adversary of Boniface VIII., should be able to rely in his conflict with the leader of the Church on the popular consent obtained at a meeting of the Three Estates of France - all point to a singular demoralization of the sentiments and principles on which were based the whole power of the pontiff of Rome and the entire organization of medieval Catholicism.

Like the others, Anna Pavlovna Scherer showed Pierre the change of attitude toward him that had taken place in society.

The satisfaction of one's needs--good food, cleanliness, and freedom--now that he was deprived of all this, seemed to Pierre to constitute perfect happiness; and the choice of occupation, that is, of his way of life--now that that was so restricted--seemed to him such an easy matter that he forgot that a superfluity of the comforts of life destroys all joy in satisfying one's needs, while great freedom in the choice of occupation--such freedom as his wealth, his education, and his social position had given him in his own life--is just what makes the choice of occupation insolubly difficult and destroys the desire and possibility of having an occupation.

But amid these cares her anxiety about Pierre was evident.

For his researches in this department he was in 1903 awarded a Nobel prize jointly with Pierre Curie.