Sentence Examples with the word pace

Her daily debate about drinking blood made her pace in front of Damian's room until he wrenched the door open and stared at her, bleary-eyed and bare-chested.

The most important of the recruiting laws passed since 1870 are those of 1872, 1889 and 1905, the last the loi de deux ans which embodies the last efforts of the French war department to keep pace with the ever-growing numbers of the German empire.

In the Sala dei Nove or della Pace above are the noble allegorical frescoes of Ambrogio Lorenzetti representing the effects of just and unjust government; the Sala delle Balestre or del Mappamondo is painted by Simone di Martino (Memmi) and others, the Cappella della Signoria by Taddeo di Bartolo, and the Sala del Consistorio by Beccafumi.

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The pace at which a hunter should be ridden at his fences depends upon the nature of the fence, and the peculiarities of each individual horse.

Ere now it has been related how Ahab was wont to pace his quarter-deck, taking regular turns at either limit, the binnacle and mainmast; but in the multiplicity of other things requiring narration it has not been added how that sometimes in these walks, when most plunged in his mood, he was wont to pause in turn at each spot, and stand there strangely eyeing the particular object before him.

He kept the pace slow, despite his hunger, and deepened the kiss.

Kutuzov accompanied by his adjutants rode at a walking pace behind the carabineers.

Wolzogen came to the assistance of his chief, who spoke French badly, and began translating for him, hardly able to keep pace with Pfuel, who was rapidly demonstrating that not only all that had happened, but all that could happen, had been foreseen in his scheme, and that if there were now any difficulties the whole fault lay in the fact that his plan had not been precisely executed.

Instead of wide, barren, wind-swept valleys, here are found fertile alluvial plains - such as Manipur - but for the most part the erosive action of the river has been able to keep pace with the rise of the river bed, and we have deep, steep-sided valleys eating their way northwards owing to the greater rainfall on the southern than on the northern slopes.

So rapid has been the land elevation of Central Afghanistan that the erosive action of rivers has not been able to keep pace with that of upheaval; and the result all through Afghanistan (but specially marked in the great central highlands between Kabul and Herat) is the formation of those immensely deep gorges and defiles which are locally known as darns.