Sentence Examples with the word notoriety

His brother, Giovanni Filoteo Achillini (1466-1533), was the author of Il Viridario and other writings, verse and prose, and his grand-nephew, Claudio Achillini (1574-1640), was a lawyer who achieved some notoriety as a versifier of the school of the Secentisti.

The writers of the silver age found fault with his prolixity, want of sparkle and epigram, and monotony of his clausulae.4 A certain Largius Licinius gained notoriety by attacking his Latinity in a work styled Ciceromastix.

How far the extraordinary corruption of private morals which has gained for the restoration period so unenviable a notoriety was owing to the king's own example of flagrant debauchery, how far to the natural reaction from an artificial Puritanism, is uncertain, but it is incontestable that Charles's cynical selfishness was the chief cause of the degradation of public life which marks his reign, and of the disgraceful and unscrupulous betrayal of the national interests which raised France to a threatening predominance and imperilled the very existence of Britain for generations.

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Bradlaugh, who had attained some notoriety for an Bradlan b aggressive atheism, claimed the right to make an affirmation of allegiance instead of taking the customary oath, which he declared was, in his eyes, a meaningless form.

Island Magee had, besides antiquarian remains, a notoriety as a home of witchcraft, and was the scene of an act of reprisal for the muchdisputed massacre of Protestants about 1641, by the soldiery of Carrickfergus.

As a member of the Duma he attained a certain notoriety by impassioned speeches and appeals for root-and-branch reform, but he was never conspicuous for steady work or constructive statesmanship. When the first Revolutionary Government was formed people were astonished to hear that Kerensky had been nominated Minister of Justice.

Pitchblende attained considerable notoriety towards the end of the 19th century on account of two important discoveries.

It did not, however, attain to great notoriety until in 1830 an anonymous article (by E.

He gained some notoriety in 1650 by restoring to life a woman who had been hanged for infanticide.

Even the churches offered little opposition to the excesses of persons in authority, and in many instances the clergy, both Protestant and Catholic, acquired an unenviable notoriety for their readiness to overlook or condone actions which outraged the higher sentiments of humanity.