Sentence Examples with the word melancholy

Then I entered into the melancholy details of the relation in which the great statesman stood to his party and to the representatives of the people.

And the battle of Mohacs is the most melancholy and discreditable period of Hungarian history.

Yet I experienced sometimes that the most sweet and tender, the most innocent and encouraging society may be found in any natural object, even for the poor misanthrope and most melancholy man.

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The melancholy state of the country consequent upon the persecutions of Rudolph I., Ferdinand II.

Joseph Bajza was a lyricist of a somewhat melancholy cast, but his Borenek (Wine Song), Sohajtds (Sigh), Ebreszto (Awakening) and Apotheosis are much admired.

Don't use melancholy for an excuse for crass behavior.

But in Julie's presence, looking at her red face and chin (nearly always powdered), her moist eyes, and her expression of continual readiness to pass at once from melancholy to an unnatural rapture of married bliss, Boris could not utter the decisive words, though in imagination he had long regarded himself as the possessor of those Penza and Nizhegorod estates and had apportioned the use of the income from them.

His commanding stature, the symmetry of his form, the dark and melancholy beauty of his countenance, rather rendered piquant than impaired by an obliquity of vision, produced an imposing impression even before his deep and powerful voice had given utterance to its melodious thunders; and harsh and superficial half-truths enunciated with surpassing ease and grace of gesture, and not only with an air of absolute conviction but with the authority of a prophetic messenger, in tones whose magical fascination was inspired by an earnestness beyond all imitation of art, acquired a plausibility and importance which, at least while the orator spoke, made his audience entirely forgetful of their preconceived objections against them.

The best work of the Belgian romanticists is in the rich and picturesque prose of the 16th century romance of Charles de Coster (see DE Coster), and in the melancholy and semi-philosophical writings of the moralist Octave Pirmez.

The kingdom was in the desperate state described in the last melancholy pages of the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, when life and property were nowhere safe from the objectless ferocity of feudal tyrants when every shire was full of castles and every castle filled with devils and evil men, and the people murmured that Christ and his saints slept.