Sentence Examples with the word meanness

But soon the partial or total conquest of the Spanish inheritance proved the grandeur of his beginnings and the meanness of his end.

He was characterized by an absolutely fearless honesty, which sometimes gave offence, but at the basis of his nature there was a warm, tender and sympathetic heart, incapable of meanness or intrigue.

We never learned meanness of them.

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Over and above those faults, which made him odious to his fellow-citizens, we trace in him a meanness that our century is less willing to condone.

At her instigation he threw over his faithful and able favourite, a meanness which is said to have caused him well-deserved remorse.

The saving salt of Elizabeth's character, with all its wellnigh incredible mixture of heroism and egotism, meanness and magnificence, was simply this, that, overmuch as she loved herself, she did yet love England better.

I wanted to live deep and suck out all the marrow of life, to live so sturdily and Spartan-like as to put to rout all that was not life, to cut a broad swath and shave close, to drive life into a corner, and reduce it to its lowest terms, and, if it proved to be mean, why then to get the whole and genuine meanness of it, and publish its meanness to the world; or if it were sublime, to know it by experience, and be able to give a true account of it in my next excursion.

The intolerable meanness advocated for the sake of the paltriest gains, the entire ignoring of any pursuit in life except money-getting, and the representation of the whole duty of man as consisting first in the attainment of a competent fortune, and next, when that fortune has been attained, in spending not more than half of it, are certainly repulsive enough.

Hospitality, generosity, personal bravery were the subjects of praise; meanness and cowardice those of satire.

The relative sizes of these mountains have assigned to them their definite correlations with characters: the ist with charity, love, libertinage; the and with religiosity, ambition, love of honour, pride, superstition; the 3rd with wisdom, good fortune, prudence, or when deficient improvidence, ignorance, failure; the 4th when large makes for success, celebrity, intelligence, audacity, when small meanness or love of obscurity; the 5th indicates love of knowledge, industry, aptitude for commerce, and in its extreme forms on the one hand love of gain and dishonesty, on the other slackness and laziness.