Sentence Examples with the word machine

Hornell has extensive car shops of the Erie railroad, and among its manufactures are silk goods (silk gloves being a specially important product), sash, doors and blinds, leather, furniture, shoes, white-goods, wire-fences, foundry and machine shop products, electric motors, and brick and tile.

The army of Matthias was not only a military machine of first-rate efficiency, but an indispensable civilizing medium.

Every nail driven should be as another rivet in the machine of the universe, you carrying on the work.

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The first patents for the electrolysis of alkaline chlorides were taken out in 1851 and several others later on; but commercial success was utterly impossible until the invention of the dynamo machine allowed the production of the electric current at a sufficiently cheap rate.

The earliest machine of this kind appears to have been made in 1 755 by Dr. William Cullen, who produced the vacuum by means of a pump alone.

The climate and the scenery in and about Biddeford attract summer visitors and there are two resorts, Biddeford Pool and Fortune Rocks within the municipal limits; but the city is chiefly a manufacturing centre (third in rank among the cities of the state in 1905) - good water-power being furnished by the river - and cotton goods, foundry and machine shop products and lumber are the principal products, the first being by far the most important.

The manufactures are chiefly sugar, fertilizers, and such products of the foundry and machine shop as are required for the machinery of the sugar factories.

The liqueuring is nowadays generally carried out by means of a machine which regulates the quantity to a nicety.

Since leaving college, she'd stayed in shape through the local gym, where she lifted weights and forced herself onto a cardio machine twice a week.

PUMP, 1 a machine which drives a liquid from one point to another, generally at different levels, the latter being usually the higher; an air-pump is an appliance for exhausting or I The word appears apparently first in English in the Promptorium Parvulorum, c. 1440, of a ship's pump (hauritorium), in Dutch (pompe), a little later, dialectically, of a conduit pipe for water, but in the sense of a means of raising water it does not occur in Dutch or Ger.