Sentence Examples with the word ludicrous

I didn't know, but it bothered me immeasurably. qqq I'm sure we all felt we were on some ludicrous death watch with Mrs. Abbott holding our future hostage with her tenuous cling to life.

Swift's grave humour and power of enforcing momentous truth by ludicrous exaggeration were next displayed in his Modest Proposal for Preventing the' Children of Poor People from being a Burden to their Parents or the Country, by fattening and eating them (1729), a parallel to the Argument against Abolishing Christianity, and as great a masterpiece of tragic as the latter is of comic irony.

All originality is crushed out and a blind and ludicrous dependence on written tradition - even in things profane - takes its place.

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Dean realized from his past experience that being forthcoming and subjecting himself to interrogation without an attorney was naive but the entire idea of his trying to kill Shipton was so ludicrous in his mind, he tended to minimize the seriousness of the situation.

In fact, it was ludicrous - but it still hurt.

It's almost ludicrous what ultimately evolved to how it began.

He was probably not unconscious of this danger; for, as he gained experience as a writer, his diction became more simple, and his ludicrous illustrations less frequent.

At length he would reach the corn, and selecting a suitable ear, frisk about in the same uncertain trigonometrical way to the topmost stick of my wood-pile, before my window, where he looked me in the face, and there sit for hours, supplying himself with a new ear from time to time, nibbling at first voraciously and throwing the half-naked cobs about; till at length he grew more dainty still and played with his food, tasting only the inside of the kernel, and the ear, which was held balanced over the stick by one paw, slipped from his careless grasp and fell to the ground, when he would look over at it with a ludicrous expression of uncertainty, as if suspecting that it had life, with a mind not made up whether to get it again, or a new one, or be off; now thinking of corn, then listening to hear what was in the wind.

The ludicrous caricatures of the animals occupy my mind to the exclusion of the moral.

It shows in its author a want of reverence, a want of decency in the proper sense, a too great readiness to condescend to the easiest kind of ludicrous ideas and the kind most acceptable at that time to the common run of mankind.