Sentence Examples with the word layman

He was associate professor of history and political economy at Bryn Mawr in1885-1888and at Wesleyan University in 1888-1890; professor of jurisprudence and political economy at Princeton in 1890-1895, of jurisprudence in 1895-1897, and subsequently of jurisprudence and politics; and in 1902 he became president of Princeton University, being the first layman to hold that office.

At the Restoration he was favourably received at court, and in 1665 would have received the provostship of Eton, if he would have taken orders; but this he refused to do, on the ground that his writings on religious subjects would have greater weight coming from a layman than a paid minister of the Church.

He was a wealthy layman who had devoted his life to a study of the occult sciences and the deeper problems of philosophy.

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Thus in the story of the good layman Citta, it is an aspiration expressed on the deathbed; 2 in the dialogue on the subject, it is a thought dwelt on during life, 3 in the numerous stories in the Peta and Vimana V atthus it is usually some isolated act, in the discussions in the Dhamma Sangani it is some mental disposition, which is the Karma (doing or action) in the one life determining the position of the individual in the next.

He at once felt that this was his vocation, and the next day, layman as he was, he went up to Assisi and began to preach to the poor 0209).

In part they had provided a field in which the layman could prove that he too was a priest; in part they had brought the West into a living and continuous contact with a new faith and a new civilization.

St Louis, the true type of the religious crusader, once said that a layman ought only to argue with a blasphemer against Christian law by running his sword into the bowels of the blasphemer as far as it would go: 1 Frederick II.

Why the layman was forbidden a mixture of wool and linen (sha'atnez, Deut.

Writers, savants, poets, artists, noble and plebeian, layman and cleric, without any previous concert, or obvious connexion, were working towards that ideal of political liberty which was to unite all the Magyars.

While the papacy thus bent its energies to the destruction of the Crusades in their genuine sense, and preferred to use for its own political objects what was meant for Jerusalem, a layman took up the derelict cause with all the religious zeal which any pope had ever displayed.