Sentence Examples with the word immoderate

Neither the prayers nor the threats of Richelieu, who wished indeed to destroy Spain but not Catholicism, nor the death of Gustavus Adolphus at Llltzen (1632), could repair the evils caused by this immoderate ambition.

It shows that a flying machine need not necessarily be a light, airy structure exposing an immoderate amount of surface.

A desultory sequence of ideas, an excessive vagueness and indirectness of expression, a peculiar and abnormal latinity, a constant tendency to exaggeration, and an immoderate indulgence in learned and literary allusions - all these are obstacles lying in the way of a study of Propertius.

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Earthing up therefore prevents these injuries, but where practised to an immoderate extent it materially reduces the produce of tubers.

Hence the immoderate extension given to French activity by his classical Latin spirit; hence also his conquests, leading on from one to another, and instead of being mutually helpful interfering with each other; hence, finally, his not entirely coherent policy, interrupted by hesitation and counter-attractions.

It was recognized that the inheritance of future generations was being recklessly sacrificed to satisfy the immoderate desire for profit.

The universal custom of sleeping on the house-top in summer promotes rheumatic and neuralgic affections; and in the Koh Daman of Kabul, which the natives regard as having the finest of climates, the mortality from fever and bowel complaint, between July and October, is great, the immoderate use of fruit predisposing to such ailments.

I have been (as your majesty knoweth best) never author of any immoderate counsel, but always desired to have things carried suavibus modis.

Leo's lively interest in art and literature, to say nothing of his natural liberality, his nepotism, his political ambitions and necessities, and his immoderate personal luxury, exhausted within two years the hard savings of Julius II., and precipitated a financial crisis from which he never emerged and which was a direct cause of most of the calamities of his pontificate.

That local taxation as a whole, though susceptible of some redistribution, is neither immoderate nor burdensome.