Sentence Examples with the word humiliation

But it was not until Great Britain was suffering from the humiliation of defeat that he was convinced that the time for granting that retrocession had arrived.

His unwillingness to agree to the coalition was magnified into a determination to defeat it, though it is quite obvious that he could only gain by the humiliation of Frederick, and nothing was ever proved against him.

His acceptance of the Interim in 548 did not bring him freedom; but this came in consequence of the humiliation of Charles V.

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The Golden Bull has been described as consecrating the humiliation of the crown by the great barons, whose usurpations it legalized; the more usually accepted view, however, is that it was directed not so much to weakening as to strengthening the crown by uniting its interests with those of the mass of the Magyar nobility, equally threatened by the encroachments of the great barons.

The council thereupon acquiesced in its own humiliation by meekly accepting a royal brief changing its official title from Riksrdd (council of state) to Kungligarc d (royal council) - a visible sign that the senators were no longer the king's colleagues but his servants.

But Catherine, still in difficulties, was obliged to watch in silence the collapse of her party in Poland, and submit to the double humiliation of recalling her ambassador and withdrawing her army from the country.

He at once agreed to everything, and put the matter before the Emperor, said Princess Anna Mikhaylovna enthusiastically, quite forgetting all the humiliation she had endured to gain her end.

In later post-exilian times this great day of atonement became to an increasing degree a day of humiliation for sin and penitent sorrow, accompanied by confession; and the sins confessed were not only of a purely ceremonial character, whether voluntary or inadvertent, but also sins against righteousness and the duties which we owe to God and man.

Were a period of unmitigated humiliation and disaster.

At the last he fought not so much for an idea as for the humiliation of an opponent by whom he had been ungenerously treated.