Sentence Examples with the word etymological

The occupants of Edom during practically the whole period of Biblical history were the Bedouin tribes which claimed 1 A curious etymological speculation connects the name with the story of Esau's begging for Jacob's pottage, Gen.

This aspirate, expressed by j, often has no etymological origin; for example, Jimdalo, a nickname applied to Andalusians, is simply the word Andaluz pronounced with the strong aspiration.

Jamieson's name stands at the head of a tolerably long list of works in the Bibliotheca britannica; but by far his most important book is the laborious and erudite compilation, best described by its own title-page: An Etymological Dictionary of the Scottish Language; illustrating the words in their different significations by examples from Ancient and Modern Writers; shewing their Affinity to those of other Languages, and especially the Northern; explaining many terms which though now obsolete in England were formerly common to both countries; and elucidating National Rites, Customs and Institutions in their Analogy to those of other nations; to which is prefixed a Dissertation on the Origin of the Scottish Language.

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In his dictionary, again, he recast the lexicological materials independently, and enriched lexicography itself, especially by his numerous etymological explanations.

This etymological study of Sumerian is attended with incalculable difficulties, because nearly all the Sumerian texts which we possess are written in an idiom which is quite evidently under the influence of Semitic. With the exception of some very ancient texts, the Sumerian literature, consisting largely of religious material such as hymns and incantations, shows a number of Semitic loanwords and grammatical Semitisms, and in many cases, although not always, is quite patently a translation of Semitic ideas by Semitic priests into the formal religious Sumerian language.

His chief studies, however, were philological; and in 1829 he published An Etymological Glossary of English Words of Foreign Derivation.

This work in twenty-one books (KaOoXLKit 7rpocrcp5La) included also an account of the etymological part of grammar.

By an etymological confusion with the Lat.

It is clear that in the original form of the tradition the name of the foundling was Scyld or Sceldwea, and that his cognomen'Scefing (derived from sceaf, a sheaf) was misinterpreted as a patronymic. Sceaf, therefore, is no genuine personage of tradition, but merely an etymological figment.

Altare, from altos, high; some ancient etymological guesses are recorded by St Isidore of Seville in Etymologiae xv.