Sentence Examples with the word eclectic

The most interesting Peripatetic work of the period is the treatise De mundo, which is a good example within the Peripatetic school of the eclectic tendency which was then in the air.

Traces of this eclectic tendency are discoverable as far back as 280 B.C., but for practical purposes the dates of the school may be given as from about 30 B.C. to A.D.

According to the relative predominance of these two elements arose Gnosticism, the Patristic theology, and the philosophical schools of Neo-Pythagoreanism, Neo-Platonism and eclectic Platonism.

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He is not a systematic thinker, but is too much affected by the eclectic notion of reconciling all philosophies.

Three views were held: that the Auctor copied from Cicero; that they were independent of each other, parallelisms being due to their having been taught by the same rhetorician at Rome; that Cicero made extracts from the Rhetorica, as well as from other authorities, in his usual eclectic fashion.

In the second part he had his own knowledge of events and the information of his contemporaries as his source: in the first he used the same authorities which we still possess - the Gesta, Fulcher, and Albert of Aix - in somewhat of an eclectic spirit, choosing now here, now there, according as he could best weave a pleasant narrative, but not according to any real critical principle.

On graduation, in 1856, Garfield became professor of ancient languages and literature in the Eclectic Institute at Hiram, and within a year had risen to the presidency of the institution.

It was an attitude of mind, not a body of doctrine; its nearest parallel is probably to be found in the eclectic strivings of the Renaissance philosophy and the modernizing tendencies of cisalpine humanism.

In the matter of Universals, Duns was more of a realist and less of an eclectic than Aquinas.

Other quarterly reviews worth mentioning are the Eclectic Review (1805-1868), edited down to 1834 by Josiah Conder (1789-1855) and supported by the Dissenters; the British Review (1811-1825; the Christian Remembrancer (1819-1868); the Retrospective Review (1820-1826, 1828, 1853-1854), for old books; the Foreign Quarterly Review (1827-1846), afterwards incorporated with the Westminster; the Foreign Review (1828-1829); the Dublin Review (1836), a Roman Catholic organ; the Foreign and Colonial Quarterly Review (1843-1847); the Prospective Review (1845-1855), given up to theology and literature, previously the Christian Teacher (1835-1844); the North British Review (1844-1871); the British Quarterly Review (1845), successor to the British and Foreign Review (1835-1844); the New Quarterly Review (1852-1861), the Scottish Review (1853-1862), published at Glasgow; the Wesleyan London Quarterly Review (1853-); the National Review (1855-1864); the Diplomatic Review (1855-1881); the Irish Quarterly Review (1851-1859), brought out in Dublin; the Home and Foreign Review (1862-1864); the Fine Arts Quarterly Review (1863-1865); the New Quarterly Magazine (1873-1880); the Catholic Union Review (1863-1874); the Anglican Church Quarterly Review (1875); Mind (1876), dealing with mental philosophy; the Modern Review (1880-1884); the Scottish Review (1882); the Asiatic Quarterly Review (1886; since 1891 the Imperial and Asiatic Quarterly Review); and the Jewish Quarterly Review.