Sentence Examples with the word dividend

If all the trade between Russia and Teheran were to pass over this road, the tolls would no doubt pay a fair dividend on the capital, but much of it goes by way of the TeherAnMeshed--i-Sar route, which is much shorter and has no tolls.

The original dividend is written as 0987063, since its initial figures are greater than those of the divisor; if the dividend had commenced with (e.g.) 3.

The bank has made steady progress in spite of innumerable difficulties, and paid a fair dividend to its shareholders.

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At each stage of the division the number of digits in the reduced dividend is decreased by one.

Division was accomplished by multiplying the divisor until the dividend was reached; the answer being the number of times the divisor was so multi- I plied.

As before, the sums paid out in respect of guaranteed dividend were to be regarded as advances which were to be paid back to the state out of the profits made, when these permitted, and when the advances were wiped out, the profits, after payment of a certain dividend, were to be divided between the state and the railway, two-thirds going to the former and one-third to the latter.

So let's say your parents bought Coca Cola stock their entire life, left it all to you, and you are able to live off the dividend payments of the stock.

It will be regarded as a dividend of the work of the one hundred prior generations that got the world to this point.

Mr Scudamore, who was regarded as the author of the bill for the acquisition of the telegraph systems, reported that the charges made by the telegraph companies were too high and tended to check the growth of telegraphy; that there were frequent delays of messages; that many important districts were unprovided with facilities; that in many places the telegraph office was inconveniently remote from the centre of business and was open for too small a portion of the day;' that little or no improvement could be expected so long as the working of the telegraphs was conducted by commercial companies striving chiefly to earn a dividend and engaged in wasteful competition with each other; that the growth of telegraphy had been greatly stimulated in Belgium and Switzerland by the annexation of the telegraphs to the Post Offices of those countries and the consequent adoption of a low scale of charges; that in Great Britain like results would follow the adoption of like means, and that the association of the telegraphs with the Post Office would produce great advantage to the public and ultimately a large revenue to the state.

Some stocks pay dividends very regularly: Coca Cola, for instance, has paid a dividend every year since 1920.