Sentence Examples with the word derision

The applause of the vulgar was mingled with the derision of the court party.

Four of the five vamps he'd chosen as bodyguards were exchanging looks of derision behind his back, and the vamp he tried to interrogate was openly ridiculing him.

Yet they rejected with scorn and derision the pacific overtures of their political opponents, the Potoccy, the Radziwillowie, and the Braniscy, Prince Michal openly declaring that of two tyrannies he preferred the tyranny of the Muscovite to the 2 Michal Kazimierz Radziwill alone was worth thirty millions.

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On the 15th of June 1.566 the unfortunate youth, bruised and bleeding from shocking ill-treatment, was placed upon a wretched hack, with a crown of straw on his head, and led in derision through the streets of Stockholm.

To Varennes, he published a pamphlet, L'Acephocratie, in which he demanded the establishment of a federal republic. On the 1st of July, in a speech at the Jacobin club he spoke of a republic, and the reference called out the stormy derision of the partisans of the constitutional monarchy; but repeating his demand for a republic on the 15th of the same month, the speech was ordered to be printed and to be sent to the branch societies throughout France.

I concluded that he laughed in derision of my efforts, confident of his own resources.

Some fighting Catholics haunted woods and hills under the name of tories, afterwards given in derision to a great party, and were hunted down with as little compunction as the wolves to which they were compared.

QUAKERS, originally a cant name applied in derision to the members of the Society of Friends, but now used without any contemptuous significance.

When, then, on the 10th of June 1810, the prince's body was conveyed to Stockholm, and Fersen, in his official capacity as Riksnzarskalk, received it at the barrier and led the funeral cortege into the city, his fine carriage and his splendid robes seemed to the people an open derision of the general grief.

His popular name of Der Gutige (the good sort of man) expressed as much derision as affection.