Sentence Examples with the word credulous

Napier lived, too, not only in a wild country, which was in a lawless and unsettled state during most of his life, but also in a credulous and superstitious age.

Nor, credulous as such minds must have been, was this conceit altogether without some faint show of superstitious probability.

The treacherous vizier, however, made our too credulous political officers believe that Mehrab Khan was to blame; his object being to bring his master to ruin and to obtain for himself all power in the state, knowing that Mehrab's successor was only a child.

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In point of style the historians of the period are laboured and rhetorical; they were mostly credulous friars who wrote in isto,y.

Upon this matter there has been, it is true, some diversity of opinion among modern scholars, but it is now generally admitted, and can be abundantly shown, that he was not only diligent in gathering material, but also far more thorough-going than most writers of antiquity in discriminating between trustworthy and untrustworthy reports, frank in acknowledging his ignorance, scrupulous in indicating his authorities in doubtful cases, less credulous than most of his contemporaries, and unfailingly honest.

Historical truth need not be taken into consideration in the matter; and if, notwithstanding James Gairdner's essay appended to his Life and Reign of Richard III., there are still credulous persons left to think and assert that Perkin was not an impostor, they will derive little satisfaction from Ford's play, which with really surprising skill avoids the slightest indication as to the poet's own belief on the subject.

But if he was credulous of marvels, he was careful to insist on good evidence for what he accepted as Christ's own teaching, in the face of current unauthorized views.

No one was safe from these zealous and too often credulous defenders of the established order; and a few indiscreet words spoken in a coffee house were enough to bring imprisonment and ruin, as in the case of John Frost, a respectable attorney, condemned for sedition in March 1793.

At the head of the opposition was Ferdinand, the heir to the throne, as insignificant as his rival, but endowed with all good qualities by the credulous favor of the people.

The awe-stricken credulous slaves in the vicinity took it for the bones of one of the fallen angels.