Sentence Examples with the word cranberry

Among indigenous fruitbearing trees, shrubs, vines and plants are the plum, cherry, grape, blackberry, raspberry, cranberry and strawberry.

Among the fruitbearing trees, shrubs, vines and plants the grape, the blue-berry, the cherry, the plum and the cranberry are indigenous and more or less common.

In the south-central part of the state there are valuable cranberry marshes.

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Rather let it be named from the fishes that swim in it, the wild fowl or quadrupeds which frequent it, the wild flowers which grow by its shores, or some wild man or child the thread of whose history is interwoven with its own; not from him who could show no title to it but the deed which a like-minded neighbor or legislature gave him--him who thought only of its money value; whose presence perchance cursed all the shores; who exhausted the land around it, and would fain have exhausted the waters within it; who regretted only that it was not English hay or cranberry meadow--there was nothing to redeem it, forsooth, in his eyes--and would have drained and sold it for the mud at its bottom.

Martha wants me to have the antiques we searched for together all the cranberry glass, the Hobstar crystal, even the Tiffany lamp she so cherished.

Along the streams in this section are many swamps, valuable for the white cedar that they produce, or when cleared, for cranberry bogs.

All the Indian huckleberry hills are stripped, all the cranberry meadows are raked into the city.

In the swamps and bogs of the south-east coast cranberry culture is practised, this district producing in 1900 three-fifths of the entire yield of the United States.

Cynthia was already at the kitchen table, amid sweet smelling scents of the morning fare of fresh cranberry scones, the ubiquitous notebook and a scattering of paper spread before her.

In 1899 New Jersey produced nearly a fourth of the cranberry crop of the United States, the chief centre of production being the bogs of Burlington and Ocean counties.