Sentence Examples with the word confidant

He recites how he had heard of the monarch's Christian profession, diligence in good works and piety, by manifold narrators and common report, but also more particularly from his (the pope's) physician and confidant (medicus et familiaris noster), Master Philip, who had received information from honourable persons of the monarch's kingdom, with whom he had intercourse in those (Eastern) parts.

Ibrahim had a confidant about whose antecedents one fact alone seems certain, that he was a maula (client) of Persian origin.

A man of doubtful reputation, Alexander's confidant and favourite, he paid the pope a large sum for his elevation.

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At Rotterdam he was a confidant of political exiles, including Burnet and the famous earl of Peterborough, and he became known to William, prince of Orange.

Pierre was one of those people who, in spite of an appearance of what is called weak character, do not seek a confidant in their troubles.

Public opinion was against lant, the king, and the small army which his confidant De Vere raised under the royal banner was easily scattered by Gloucesters forces at the rout of Radcot Bridge (Dec. 20, 1387).

A series of his most defiant oppdnents had to go into banishment, Liberius of Rome, Hilarius of Poitiers and Hosius of Corduba, the last-named once the confidant of Constantine and the actual originator of the Ho y nousios, and now nearly a hundred years old.

Ancus Marcius is merely a duplicate of Numa, as is shown by his second name, Numa Marcius, the confidant and pontifex of Numa, being no other than Numa Pompilius himself, represented as priest.

Then he conceived the idea of using the Cossacks, who were deeply attached to him, as a means of chastising the szlachta, and at the same time forcing a war with Turkey, which would make his military genius indispensable to the republic, and enable him if successful to carry out domestic reforms by force of arms. His chief confidant in this still mysterious affair was the veteran grand hetman of the crown, Stanislaw Koniecpolski, who understood the Cossacks better than any man then living, but differed from the king in preferring the conquest of the Crimea to an open war with Turkey.