Sentence Examples with the word compleat

Stow, Remarks on London and Westminster (1722); Robert Seymour (John Mottley), Survey of the Cities of London and Westminster (1 734, another edition 1753); William Maitland, History of London (1 739, other editions 1756, 1760, 1769, continued by John Entick 1775); John Entick, A New and Accurate History of London, Westminster, Southwark (1766); The City Remembrancer, Narratives of the Plague 1665, Fire 1666 and Great Storm 1703 (1769); A New and Compleat History and Survey, by a Society of Gentlemen (1770, revised by H.

He copied the account of the storm in the second voyage almost literally from Sturmy's Compleat Mariner.

In the autumn he returned to England and spent his time in writing his Salmonia or Days of Flyfishing, an imitation of The Compleat Angler.

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His publications include: Compleat View of Episcopacy, as Exhibited in the Fathers of the Christian Church, until the close of the Second Century (1771); Salvation of All Men, Illustrated and Vindicated as a Scripture Doctrine (1782); The Mystery Hid from Ages and Generations made manifest by the Gospel-Revelation (1783); and Five Dissertations on the Fall and its Consequences (1785).

Besides being a leader of the evangelical revival, he was well known as the author of The Compleat Duty of Man (London, 1763), a work in which he intended to supplement the teaching embodied in the anonymous Whole Duty of Man.

Btilbring edited two unpublished works of Defoe, The Compleat English Gentleman (London, 1890) and Of Royall Education (London, 1905), from British Museum Add.

Moreover, as the first book which raised natural history into the region of literature, much as the Compleat Angler did for that gentle art, we must affiliate to it the more finished products of later writers like Thoreau or Richard Jefferies.

Vast masses of Walsingham's correspondence are preserved in the Record Office and the British Museum; some have been epitomized in the Foreign Calendar (as far as 1582); and his correspondence during his two embassies to France was published in extenso by Sir Dudley Digges in 1655 under the title The Compleat Ambassador, possibly, as has been suggested by Dr Stahlin, to give a fillip to the similar policy then being pursued by Oliver Cromwell.