Sentence Examples with the word by no means

It is by no means easy in dealing with fossil ferns to distinguish between certain Polypodiaceae - such as species of Davallia - and members of the Cyatheaceae.

However, subsequent additions and corrections have detracted much from its value, especially when it became understood that the above sub-orders are by no means natural groups.

Every century; there is, however, now reason to think that the rate of contraction is by no means so rapid as this would indicate.

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The ascription of malevolence to the world of spirits is by no means universal.

It is by no means certain that a hard and fast line can be drawn between intraand intercellular lumina.

Hamilton was by no means devoid of sense and acuteness, but in character he was one of the most despicable men then alive.

The plains are by no means a simple unit; they are of diverse structure and of various stages of erosional development; they are occasionally interrupted by buttes and escarpments; they are frequently broken by valleys: yet on the whole a broadly extended surface of moderate relief so often prevails that the name, Great Plains, for the region as a whole is well deserved.

In the service of the Theban Ammon two priestesses called the Adorer of the God and the Wife of the God occupied very influential positions, and towards the Saite period it was by no means unusual for the king to secure these offices for his daughters and so to strengthen his own royal title.

That experiments, founded on the study of his nature and properties, which have from time to time been made to improve the breed, and bring the different varieties to the perfection in which we now find them, have succeeded, is best confirmed by the high estimation in which the horses of Great Britain are held in all parts of the civilized world; and it is not too much to assert that, although the cold, humid and variable nature of their climate is by no means favourable to the production of these animals in their very best form, Englishmen have by great care, and by sedulous attention to breeding, high feeding and good grooming, with consequent development of muscle, brougnt them to the highest state of perfection of which their nature is capable.

But these cases, though by no means infrequent, were still exceptional.