Sentence Examples with the word bound up

The Scottish-Gaelic literature, which is separately dealt with (see Celt: Literature) is, by comparison, of minor importance; and the Latin, though it has a range and influence in Scotland to which it is difficult to find a parallel in the history of the literatures of Europe, is (perhaps for the very reason of its persistency and extent) so bound up with the vernacular that it may be conveniently treated with that literature.

The inveterate local, one may perhaps say immediate, powers are felt to be nearer at hand than the national deity, who is more closely bound up with the changing national fortunes and with current philosophy.

In the great controversy with the Alexandrists he opposed the theory of Pomponazzi that the rational soul is inseparably bound up with the material part of the individual, and hence that the death of the body carries with it the death of the soul.

View more

In the 13th century these towns had become the seat of large industrial populations (varying according to different estimates from ioo,000 to 200,000 inhabitants), employed upon the weaving of cloth with its dependent industries, and closely bound up by trade interests with England, from whence they obtained the wool for their looms. Bruges, at that time connected with the sea by the river Zwijn and with Sluis as its port, was the central mart and exchange of the world's commerce.

Had been bound up with the history of the Risorgimento, but, unlike him, had represented and embodied the anti-national, reactionary spirit.

Far greater interest attaches to the so-called AngloSaxon Map of the World in the British Museum (Cotton MSS.), where it is bound up in a codex which also contains a copy of the Periegesis of Priscianus.

TELL The story of William Tell's skill in shooting at and striking the apple which had been placed on the head of his little son by order of Gessler, the tyrannical Austrian bailiff of Uri, is so closely bound up with the legendary history of the origin of the Swiss Confederation that they must be considered together.

The question of the use of the vernacular or of Hebrew is bound up with the differences between the orthodox and the liberal or reform parties, complicated by the many problems involved.

FETISHISM, an ill-defined term, used in many different senses: (a)the worship of inanimate objects, often regarded as peculiarly African; (b)negro religion in general; (c)the worship of inanimate objects conceived as the residence of spirits not inseparably bound up with, nor originally connected with, such objects; (d)the doctrine of spirits embodied in, or attached to, or conveying influence through, certain material objects (Tylor); (e)the use of charms, which are not worshipped, but derive their magical power from a god or spirit; (f)The use as charms of objects regarded as magically potent in themselves.

It was therefore only as the God of Israel that the true God could be known within Israel; and so on the one hand the little society of faith - which had not in reality the least tinge of political coherence - is thought of as yet forming the true kernel of the nation qua nation, while on the other hand the state of Judah profits by the prophetic religion inasmuch as the nation must be saved from destruction in order that the prophetic faith - which is still bound up with the idea of the nation - may not be dissolved.