Sentence Examples with the word attribute

Foxe and Knox attribute to him a prophecy of the death of the Cardinal, who was assassinated on May 29 following, partly at any rate in revenge for Wishart's death.

We have therefore the idea of an infinite, perfect and all-powerful being - an idea which cannot be the creation of ourselves, and must be given by some being who really possesses all that we in idea attribute to him.

Russian authors are still fonder of telling us that from the commencement of the campaign a Scythian war plan was adopted to lure Napoleon into the depths of Russia, and this plan some of them attribute to Pfuel, others to a certain Frenchman, others to Toll, and others again to Alexander himself--pointing to notes, projects, and letters which contain hints of such a line of action.

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It is not uncommon in popular writings to attribute this superiority to a crusader strain - a theory which no one can possibly countenance who knows what miserable degenerates the half-breed descendants of the crusaders rapidly became, as a result of their immoral life and their ignorance of the sanitary precautions necessary in a trying climate.

To attribute blame for some past disaster is rarely useful.

This attribute is used in a similar way to the xml:lang attribute detailed in the xml 1.0 specification (Third Edition).

Much of the work he did was great and enduring, but the last year of his life forbade the Romans to attribute to him that felicitas which they regarded as an inborn Quality of the highest generals.

But at times he uses language that almost compels one to attribute to him the popular view of conscience as passing its judgments with unerring certainty on individual acts.

The formal logic of Hamilton and Mansel, whose Aristotelian and scholastic learning did but accentuate their traditionalism, and whose acquiescence in consistency constituted in Mill's view a discouragement of research, such as men now incline to attribute at the least equally to Hume's idealism, Mill is only negatively justified.

This cult spread very widely among the Greeks; it had great civil importance, and lasted even into Christian times; but there is no reason to attribute to it any special connexion with the development of the science or profession of medicine.