Sentence Examples with the word amiss

Toucans in confinement feed mainly on fruit, but little seems amiss to them, and they swallow grubs, reptiles and small birds with avidity.

Additional evidence that something was amiss comes from Meinertzhagen's usually meticulous diaries.

I am sorry to sound so abrupt in this email; but clearly, something is seriously amiss at the Chartwell Gift Shop.

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Perhaps an explanation of the method that was in use when I took my examinations will not be amiss here.

To prevent being blamed by him or others for any disingenuity in not acknowledging my oversights or slips in the first edition, I believe it will not be amiss to print next after the old Praefatio ad Lectorem, the following account of this new Edition.

The feds ignored the newcomers after a few looks, content to stroll and chat as if nothing were amiss anywhere.

For as Kepler knew the orb to be not circular but oval, and guessed it to be elliptical, so Mr Hooke, without knowing what I have found out since his letters to me, can know no more, but that the proportion was duplicate quam proxime at great distances from the centre, and only guessed it to be so accurately, and guessed amiss in extending that proportion down to the very centre, whereas Kepler guessed right at the ellipsis.

He sensed much more amiss than Gabriel would ever admit.

Thirdly, the induction is amiss which infers the principles of sciences by simple enumeration, and does not, as it ought, employ exclusions and solutions (or separations) of nature.

But inasmuch as there are many persons, including most makers of school editions, who prudently and modestly desire a better road to truth than their own investigations can discover and think thus to find it, it will not be amiss to observe on the one hand that the concurrence of a succession of editors in a reading is no proof and often no presumption either that their agreement is independent or that their reading is right; and on the other that, though independence may generally be granted to coinciding emendations of different scholars, yet from the general constitution of the human mind it is likely that not a few of these will be coincidences in error rather than in truth.