Sentence Examples with the word aftermath

And when he hath mowen his medowe, then he hath his medowe grounde, soo that if he hath any weyke catell that wold be amended, or dyvers maner of catell, he may put them in any close he wyll, the which is a great advantage; and if all shulde lye commen, than wolde the edyche of the come feldes and the aftermath of all the medowes be eaten in X.

In fact, if the government doesn't do a really good job with delivering aid, it comes under blistering criticism, as was the case in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina in 2005.

It was because the aftermath of Newtonian science was so rich that the scientific faith of naturalism was able to retain a place besides its epistemological creed that a logician of the school could arise whose spirit was in some sort Baconian, but who, unlike Bacon, had entered the modern world, and faced the problems stated for it by Hume and by Newton.

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Even the police, who see the aftermath of terrible, gut-wrenching crimes, aren't forced to watch them actually happening.

So while such an attack and its aftermath would not derail our eventual arrival at the next golden age, it quite possibly would delay it.

Beak's The Aftermath of War (1906) is an account of the repatriation work in the Orange River Colony.

The aftermath of Fremont's filibustering acts, followed as they were by wholly needless hostilities and by some injustice then and later in the attitude of Americans toward the natives, was a growing misunderstanding, and estrangement regrettable in Californian history.

The constitution of 1865 was a partisan and intolerant document, a part of the evil aftermath of war; it was adopted by an insignificant majority and never had any strength in public sentiment.

If she concentrated on the here-and-now and dealt with the aftermath later, she might survive this experience.

Separatism was non-existent, for the cogent reason that there was no point toward which a new irredenta could gravitate: the Habsburg cause had no adherents, save a few discredited traitors who congregated in Graz and Vienna: and communism, which was quite alien to an agrarian and peasant-owned State, owed its passing success to the aftermath of war and the blunders of the middle class rather than to its own attractions.