Sentence Examples with the word affectation

Curiously, Apotheosis is used by the Latin Christian poet, Prudentius (c. 400), as the title of a poem defending orthodox views on the person of Christ and other points of doctrine - the affectation of a decadent age.

His style is copious and flexible; abundantly idiomatic, but without any affectation of being so, it carries with it the force and freshness of popular speech, while it lacks not at the same time a flavour of academic culture.

The reaction was shortlived; but the same affectation of antiquity is seen in the writings of Apuleius, also an African, who lived a little later than Fronto and was a man of much greater natural parts.

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This was a weak affectation that found its chief votaries amongst literary men ambitious of an easily earned artistic reputation.

All the affectation of interest she had assumed had left her kindly and tear-worn face and it now expressed only anxiety and fear.

In language they are still Scottish; if they show any southern affectations, it is (all echoes of the older aureate style notwithstanding) the affectation of Tudor and Elizabethan English.

There is a curious affectation about his style - a falsetto note - which, notwithstanding all his efforts to please, is often irritating to the reader.

There is no lack of humour in them, and there is never a hint of affectation in the writing; indeed, the author, doing spontaneously the work nearest to his hand, was very likely unconscious that he was making a contribution to history.

There is no affectation about them, and as they come straight from your heart, so they go straight to mine.

But he is always ingenious, often witty, and nobody has carried farther than he the harmony of diction, sometimes marred by an affectation of symmetry and an excessive use of antithesis.