Sentence Examples with the word Tom

It was some local peeping Tom by the sound of it.

The naturalness of his acting fascinated those who, like Partridge in Tom Jones, listened to nature's voice, and justified the preference of more conscious critics.

Municipal ownership has been further developed in Cleveland than in any other large city in the United States, chiefly because of the advocacy of Tom Loftin Johnson (born 1854), a street-railway owner, iron manufacturer, an ardent single-taxer, who was elected mayor of the city in 1901, 1903, 1905 and 1907.

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She did attempt to engage an uninterested climber in a conversation about her Great-aunt Annie being one of the founders of the Ouray Woman's Club, back in 1897 and how she helped form the Ouray Library, with her friend, the famous millionaire, of Hope Diamond fame, Tom Walsh.

In 1875 he published The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, the sequel to which, Huckleberry Finn, did not appear until 1884.

Only a few of the principal ones can be mentioned: - the Custom House, the Royal Exchange, Marlborough House, Buckingham House, and the Hall of the College of Physicians - now destroyed; others which exist are - at Oxford, the Sheldonian theatre, the Ashmolean museum, the Tom Tower of Christ Church, and Queen's College chapel; at Cambridge, the library of Trinity College and the chapel of Pembroke, the latter at the cost of Bishop Matthew Wren, his uncle.

Pocahontas, perhaps the most remarkable mare in the Stud-Book, never won a race on the turf, but threw Stockwell and Rataplan to the Baron, son of Birdcatcher, King Tom to Harkaway, Knight of St Patrick to Knight of St George, and Knight of Kars to Nutwith-all these horses being 16 hands high and upwards, while Pocahontas was a long low mare of about 15 hands or a trifle more.

No, but there's nothing odd about a Tom cat wandering off for a few days.

Just above Holyoke the Connecticut leaves the rugged highlands through a rift between Mt Tom (1214 ft.; ascended by a mountain-railway from Holyoke) and Mt Holyoke (954 ft.), and begins a meandering valley course, falling (in the Hadley Falls) in great volume some 60 ft.

Frenchie was beaten badly by old Tom who Mrs. Rinaldi struck with a poker, but she was more troubled that he bled on her carpet than by sobbing Frenchie huddled in the corner and Tom, who remained near-dead when his friends dragged him out into the snowy night.